Rise and Rise again until Lambs become Lions.

By AUtigers13, in 'English to Latin Translation', Jul 23, 2011.

  1. AUtigers13 New Member

    I am interested in getting this phrase as a tattoo, and would like to get in translated into Latin. I've searched through the previous threads to see if this has been done before but only found one thread that didnt fully translate it. I would like it translated very literally. Just as you would read it. Im not sure what tense you would put this under so Im just going with the translation I am given. Also, this might be too much but the full phrase is:
    Rise and Rise
    again and again
    like the Phoenix
    from the Ashes
    until the Lambs
    become Lions and
    The Rule of Darkness
    is no more.

    IF that can be translated that would be GREAT!
    Thank You All!
  2. AUtigers13 New Member

    Also, it might help...Im using it in the obvious "never give up"/"Keep on going"/"Keep on fighting" sense.
    Thanks Again.
  3. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    my take on that would be

    ne surgere desieris

    etiam atque etiam

    sicut Phoenix

    a cineribus

    usque dum agni

    fiant leones et

    regnum tenebrarum

    pereat

    NB: The individual parts only work if they are all put together in one sentence (just in case you want to leave something out - beware!)
    Bernardo Virtuoso likes this.
  4. AUtigers13 New Member

    Thank You so much! I hate to be a bother but if those only work as a complete sentence would you mind giving:
    Rise and Rise
    again and again
    like the Phoenix
    from the Ashes
    until the Lambs
    become Lions.

    and...

    Rise and Rise
    Again Until Lambs
    Become Lions.

    This way I can see all three and get the best idea of what will "look" the best.
    Thanks Again!
  5. Manus Correctrix QVAE CORRIGIT

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Victoria
    That would be:

    Ne surgere desieris
    etiam atque etiam
    sicut Phœnix
    a cineribus
    usque dum agni
    fiant leones.


    then. For the shortened version, just take the first line and the last two.
    Bernardo Virtuoso likes this.
  6. Gerardo Riera New Member

    Hi people, i would like to get this phrase translated. It's for a tattoo

    "Rise and rise again until lambs become lions".

    I have no idea about Latin... so, you know.. hehe. However.. i found this translation:

    "Surge et resurge dum agni leones fiant."

    But... I used the google translator and I found that the word "until" doesn't appear, does it? What do you think?

    Thanks very much !
  7. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
    I think that you shouldn't ever trust Google Translate, because I confirm the translation you were given.

    Edit: Although, perhaps I'd use surgito and resurgito...
  8. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    "Dum + subj" can mean "until"?
  9. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
  10. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Dictionary says it is very rare, wouldn't it be better to use some other form?
  11. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
    Donec is an equivalent, si placeat.
  12. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Btw Google Translate using rare forms and translating a sentence correctly, is this a sign of an uncoming apocalypse?
  13. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
    Sorry, Google Translate gives me this: Surge, et agnorum, resurrecturi in lacum leonum. A bit far-fetched, no? ;)

    I think he meant that he received the translation from another source and dubiously "checked" the accuracy of the translation with Google Translate.
    Laurentius likes this.
  14. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Ahhhh good so maybe I can reach my thirties.
  15. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    This Russell Crowe nugget isn't wholly successful rhetoric, in my view. It's not too important that we can't tell whether the command is addressed to one person or multiple persons, but is the verb "become" intended as 2nd person or 3rd? If it's intended as 2nd person, the English is clumsy; if it's 3rd, who is the person (or persons) being bidden to rise on the one hand and who are the lambs that will become lions on the other?
  16. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Rise, as well as those of the lambs that will rise again into the lake of the lions!
    Waw, nice, sounds very mysterious...
  17. Imber Ranae Ranunculus Iracundus

    • Civis Illustris
    Not sure what dictionary you're looking at, because it's not rare at all.
  18. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
  19. Imber Ranae Ranunculus Iracundus

    • Civis Illustris
    That's subsection I. 2. b. Look right below it at II. (α.) : "II. In immediate suceession, until, until that (with the subjunctive or the indicative, as the idea of aim or simply of time predominates"

    As for "causal accessory notion", the Livy example is instructive: Obsidio deinde per paucos dies magis quam oppugnatio fuit, dum vulnus ducis curaretur, "The siege then lasted for a few days longer than the assault, until the general's wound could heal (i.e. in order to wait for his wound to be healed/long enough for his wound to be healed). There's a notion of purpose or cause involved, expressing the reason why the siege lasted longer than the assault.
    Last edited by Imber Ranae, Feb 17, 2014
    Laurentius likes this.
  20. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Ahhh ok thank you, sorry for mistake! :)

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