1. Hermes Trismegistus Member

    Location:
    Brasilia
    Magistro scribente, ...
    Magisitro scribenti, ....

    Alative absolute ok, but what's the difference between "scribente" and "scribenti"?!
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Scribenti is dative. So magistro scribenti = literally "to the teacher writing".
  3. Hermes Trismegistus Member

    Location:
    Brasilia
    For a better context.

    Magisitro scribente, Marcus "prave scribis", inquit "sylaba im superest.."

    I thought "scribenti" was an adjective, I'm wrong though..
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Scribenti isn't an adjective; it's a regular present participle (from scribo). Magistro scribenti here plays the role of indirect object of inquit. "Marcus said to the teacher (who was) writing..."
  5. Hemo Rusticus Active Member

    Location:
    Saubha
    I think my friend Thoth here is referring to the fact that some adjectives of the third declension, participles included, have an ablative by-form in long '-ī', as in eunte/euntī (see Allen and Greenough, p. 52).

    This form in long '-ī' occurs on analogy with the dative, and also those old -jo stems like mare whose ablative is by regular phonological rules syncretic with the dative (dat. and abl. of mare are marī, although analogous abl. mare is well attested).

    The 'true', inherited form is in short '-e', as magistrō eunte.
  6. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    In this case, with participles, the -ī ending for the ablative is only found when the participle is being used almost as a pure adjective, rather than an actual participle. So in an ablative absolute you wouldn't see the -ī ending used, I'm pretty sure. Perhaps in archaic texts or in poetry there are exceptions.
  7. Hermes Trismegistus Member

    Location:
    Brasilia
    so could you give us an example?
  8. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    "sequens" is often used not really as a participle with verbal functions, but just as an adjective, like "sequens annus" — the following year. Thus in the ablative, to say "in the following year", you could say "sequenti anno". (or "sequente anno", both work)
    However, to say something like "the teacher walked into the school, with the student following", there "sequens" is used with a verbal idea in an ablative absolute construction, so you would say "sequente discipulo".

    "sequenti discipulo" would mean something like "with the following student", i.e. the student next in line or something.
  9. Hermes Trismegistus Member

    Location:
    Brasilia
    So Following the logic.. Frequens would be that way, too.
  10. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    No, because frequens can only be an adjective; it isn't the present participle of any verb (not of any attested verb, at any rate; its ending does look like a participle ending, but if it was initially a present participle (I don't know if it was), the verb that it came from had totally disappeared by the time of our attested Latin texts).

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