Shakespeare's Thread

By Hawkwood, in 'Non-Latin Talk', Sep 27, 2017.

  1. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    Being your slave, what should I do but tend
    Upon the hours and times of your desire?
    I have no precious time at all to spend,
    Nor services to do, till you require.
    Nor dare I chide the world-without-end hour
    Whilst I, my sovereign, watch the clock for you.
    Nor think the bitterness of absence sour
    When you have bid your servant once adieu;
    Nor dare I question with my jealous thought
    Where you may be, or your affairs suppose,
    But like a sad slave, stay and think of nought,
    Save, where you are how happy you make those.
    So true a fool is love that in your will
    Though you do anything, he thinks no ill.

    57
  2. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
  3. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Lol.
  4. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
  5. Hawkwood .

    • Civis


    Both deliveries are good but do you prefer the more stylistic performance?
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hmm. I'm not sure.

    I always find those adaptations in modern settings like the second one absolutely bizarre. The first one seems to be in something like Elizabethan dress, which is bizarre too when you consider the story takes place in ancient Rome, but it feels just slightly less bizarre to me. I know both approaches can be defended. You can defend Elizabethan dress by saying that was how they did it in Shakespeare's time, and you can defend modern dress by saying that since the actors of Shakespeare's day performed in their own time's dress, we can do so too.

    Now, regarding the acting alone... I think I've a slight preference for the second one.
  7. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    Howard's eyes are ablaze and that subtle head tilt after stating that he banishes them. Both are good though.
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    One thing that I prefer in the first version is the ending.
  9. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    richard-sackville-3rd-earl-of-dorset-1589-1624-1613-oil-on-canvas-william-larkin.jpg

    Who's this cool customer?

    Embroidered velvet high heels with companion pom-pom, ivory silk hose, ornate tailored breeches laced at the knee with matching cape and a finely embroidered doublet! Offset this look with a fine ruff and sleeves and you're in elizabethan biz.

    It's a look that oozes class and refinement and states to all others that you're in absolute control and possess limitless ability.

    And at the discounted price of 100 shillings, gentleman why not treat yourselves!

    Modelled by Richard Sackville, Third Earl of Dorset.
  10. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    Agreed.
  11. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I wonder if our clothing will appear as ridiculous to people four centuries from now.
    Callaina likes this.
  12. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    Well we're rather bland compared to the flowers of lizzy.
  13. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I recently found out that an equivalent of "what/why the hell" in Shakespeare's time was "what the vengeance".

    I came across it in Coriolanus Act 3, Scene 1, Line 329:

    What the vengeance
    Could he not speak ’em fair?

    The edition I read it in takes it as a single sentence, with "what" meaning "why" (cf. Latin quid, which is literally "what" but is used like "why" as well). However, others on the Internet punctuate it differently:

    What the vengeance!
    Could he not speak ’em fair?

    Both versions make sense so I don't know who's right. The Folio apparently has a comma after "vengeance", which, given the punctuation habits of the day, could be taken either way, I think.
  14. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
  15. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I see it occurs in your favorite poem.
  16. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    I'm not sure I'd go that far. Which reminds me I've been neglectful.
  17. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Do you have a favorite? Or a few favorites? (It isn't always possible to have one favorite.)
  18. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
  19. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    Which poem are you alluding to?
  20. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Butler's Hudibras. She's been posting it bit by bit in the Every Time thread.

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