Si aliam sic unquam admisero occidito

By cosravet, in 'Latin to English Translation', May 11, 2019.

  1. cosravet New Member

    I saw this please on a forum and it was said to mean "if I do it again, kill me" but would like a second opinion. Thank you
  2. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Was the other forum called "google translate"?
  3. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    It's not as bad as Google Translate, though aliam doesn't make sense.
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Well, the sentence could make some sort of sense, like "If I ever let in another woman that way, kill (me or her, that's unclear)". But it of course doesn't make sense for the meaning that was apparently intended ("if I do it again, kill me").
  5. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    It's from Eunuchus.

    unam hanc noxiam amitte: si aliam admisero umquam, occidito.
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Ah, so it isn't a woman but another feminine noun, sc. noxiam, "offense". It was difficult to guess that without seeing the context. And there's no sic, apparently, unless there are variant readings. The translation is "[Forgive this one offense;] if I ever commit another, kill me."
  7. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    Yeah, I'll have to check my OCT, but I'm guessing whoever suggested that put in the sic in an attempt to compensate for the ellipsis.
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I just noticed the word order of admisero and umquam was changed, too.
  9. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
  10. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    The use of aliam is definitely dubious (that's a euphemism) if you make the sentence stand alone like that. In fact, the sentence simply doesn't make much sense if it isn't taken together with what precedes (i.e. unam hanc noxiam amitte). So it was weird to include it on its own in a list of supposedly conversational phrases (that's where Aurifex took it from, right?) and to translate it as simply "If I do it again, kill me".
    Last edited by Pacifica, May 11, 2019
  11. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    Yeah, maybe would have been better to have something like alium (malum)?
  12. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Perhaps the previous phrase in the book was unam hanc noxiam amitte.
  13. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    You mean aliud.

    That would make some sense, though I still wouldn't quite translate that as "If I do it again", since committing another thing (aliud) isn't the same as doing a certain thing ("it") again.
  14. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    If such were the case, I don't think Aurifex would have had trouble making sense of aliam, and he would most probably have quoted the whole thing, as well, understanding that the second part didn't make sense on its own. Now I suppose he may have been tired on that day or something, so who knows.
  15. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    Doh. Though at least I learned that al(l)ium means garlic.
  16. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    By the way, I tried searching for the phrase in the book in question, but without success.
  17. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    Yup. Some of the text is unsearchable, so one would have to find that bit manually.

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