Si fractus illabatur orbis, impavidum ferient ruinae

By Me Mea Mei, in 'Latin Beginners', May 20, 2015.

  1. Me Mea Mei New Member

    Hi all,

    I got trouble with translating the quote"Si fractus illabatur orbis, impavidum ferient ruinae" from Horace.

    This is my first try:

    Si(if) fractus(perfect passive participle of "frango(break)", in the singular nominative masculine case) illabatur(third-person singular subjunctive active of "illabor(fall)") orbis(singular nominative of "orbis(the ring; the Earth)"), impavidum(singular masculine acc./neuter nomi or acc. of "impavidus(fearless)") ferient(future active 3rd. sigular of "ferio(strike)") ruinae(singular dat. or gen./plural nom. or voc. of "ruina(ruins)").

    So my translation is:
    If the world falls (I do not understand how the "fractus" functions in the sentence), the ruin strikes the fearless.

    Your comments will be appreciated, thanks.
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    If the world, broken, should fall/if the world should break and fall, the ruins will strike [him] fearless.

    When you see the sentence alone, you can't know whether it's about "me" or "you" or "him", but I've looked at the context.
  3. Me Mea Mei New Member


    So the "fractus" is modifying “orbis”, and "impavidum" is the usage of substantive adjective?
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yes.
    I feel like it's rather modifying an unexpressed object, (eum) impavidum, "(him) fearless", rather than being really substantivized ("a fearless man"), though I guess in theory it could be...
  5. Me Mea Mei New Member

    Thanks for your help!
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Np.

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