siste nator! heroam calcas!

By LouisaHills, in 'Latin to English Translation', Apr 19, 2019.

  1. LouisaHills New Member

    I am doing family history research and came across the phrase "siste nator! heroam calcas!" in an 1859 newspaper article about one of my ancestors. I am not having any luck with online translators as the image quality is not great, so I'm not sure I'm spelling the Latin right. The context is that it was inscribed above the doorways of customers whose nightsoilman had died. Any help much appreciated!

    Attached Files:

  2. Hemo Rusticus Tom Bombadillo

    • Civis Illustris
    Well, they may have indeed printed 'siste nator', but quite certainly what they meant to print, was 'siste viator', a common formula in Roman epitaph ('stand/stop, o traveler!') And then 'heroam calcas' (which is technically a confusion of the collateral forms *heroem and heroa) means 'you tread a hero under foot/you're stepping on a hero'.
  3. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    Siste nator seems a little weird to Me.

    Nator would mean "I am being flowed/swam away"

    Siste is a command. It's like "Stand!" or "Set yourself!"

    Heroam is in the accusative, so heroam calcas= you trample on Hero.

    (Hero is a figure in Greek mythology.)


    Lol.

    But I was thinking Heroam referred to the Hero in mythology.
    Last edited by Issacus Divus, Apr 20, 2019
  4. Hemo Rusticus Tom Bombadillo

    • Civis Illustris
    That would be a marvelously weird reference!
  5. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    Lol, with all the swimming away supposed to be done with nator, I think it's what they meant.
  6. Hemo Rusticus Tom Bombadillo

    • Civis Illustris
    Oh, I guess that hadn't occurred to me. Although the word should be natator.
  7. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    It's still weird. Lol.
    Hemo Rusticus likes this.
  8. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Well, there is the word no, nare, so nator is not an illogical formation.
  9. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    That wouldn't be declined Heroa, Heroae though. The mythological character would be declined Hero, Herus, (all other forms Hero). Then again, the word heros, herois doesn't have a form heroam either, so who knows.
  10. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland

    You're right. I'll just put this here for reference:

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Latin[edit]

    Adjective[edit]

    Hērōam
    1. accusative feminine singular of Hērōus
    Last edited by Issacus Divus, Apr 21, 2019
  11. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Herous is an adjective.
    Issacus Divus likes this.
  12. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    As I thought, you're right.
    Last edited by Issacus Divus, Apr 21, 2019

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