That which does not kill you only makes you stronger

By Aristarchus13, in 'English to Latin Translation', Jul 3, 2011.

  1. Aristarchus13 New Member

    There is a very long and interesting story behind why I like this phrase but I'm not going to get into that. The reason why I want to get a latin translation is because I'm getting the phrase carved into a wooden hiking stave and would like to look at it knowing exactly what it means and smile while everyone else just scratches their heads over it. Anyway, I would appreciate any posts and will try to answer any questions pertaining to the phrase. Also, if anyone happens to know the origin of this phrase, please post it.

    Thank you to anyone who posts!
  2. Manus Correctrix QVAE CORRIGIT

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  3. Nikolaos schmikolaos

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    You're saying that's the origin of the phrase?
  4. Bitmap Civis Illustris

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    it's from Nietzsche
  5. Bitmap Civis Illustris

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    What's not mentioned in the FAT is that there is an actual Latin proverb that carries a similar sentiment: Quae nocent docent - "what hurts, teaches / what pains us, trains us".
    Judging from the rhyme, I suppose it's mediaeval.

    edit: In addition to the FAT suggestions, you could also try for a passive construction: quibus rebus non interficior, iis confirmor
    the op changed "me" to "you", though, so he might be looking for a generalised statement.
  6. Cinefactus Censor

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    I have updated the FAT to add the origin, Bitmaps suggestions, and one of my own...
  7. Aristarchus13 New Member

    There is a reason why I am using the word "you" instead of "me". I wanted it to be a sort of reminder I guess of what exactly happened (which by the way I will not explain unless stubbornly and persistently asked) in such a way that the inscription would seem to be adressing the reader. Also, I will once again say that I am getting a latin translation of the phrase not because it's "deep" or "secretive" but because, as I put it in the original post, I would like the meaning only to be known to me. The reason for this being that I have a deep and personal connection to it. My reasons behind getting my first phrases translated may have been a little...naive (which I say because I can't think of a better word) but now that's not the case. I have started several other topics where people have made comments about why I'm getting phrases like this translated and the reason is not that I find latin to be a beautiful language or that, as I said before, I find it "deep" or "secretive"-which I don't-but because I would like the meanings of these phrases known to me alone...unless of course the unlikely event occurs where someone comes along that can interpret the meaning of the latin phrase. Anyway, I don't mean this post to be rude or accusatory, I just want to make it clear why I'm getting and why I've gotten english phrases translated into latin.

    Thank you for understanding
  8. Bitmap Civis Illustris

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    Thank you.
  9. Manus Correctrix QVAE CORRIGIT

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    That sentence contradicts itself.
  10. Manus Correctrix QVAE CORRIGIT

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    OK.

    Was dich nicht umbringt, macht dich stärker.

    Ea te corroborant, quæ non interficiunt.

    Both fulfil the criteria.
  11. socratidion Civis Illustris

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    Possibly conficiunt for interficiunt? No reason, just getting into this alliteration thing.
  12. Bitmap Civis Illustris

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    I don't think that would be understood as "to kill"
  13. socratidion Civis Illustris

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    Well, I wondered about that too, but figured it would be like the English 'finish off', which depends for its meaning on the setting -- the kind of sentence it appears in (as well as the wider context). The slave finished off the job. The slave finished me off. Two clearly different senses. So here, 'what doesn't finish you off makes you stronger'...

    (Maybe we could test it by finding out if conficio ever takes a personal object in its more benign sense).

    Later edit: hmm, it does appear in the sense of 'put together' (ie gather) with objects like 'exercitus'; and exercitus also appears as object in the 'kill/destroy' sense. This weakens my case, and I am happy to withdraw the suggestion. But run with me just a bit: what other plausible meaning could it have in this context? Is it really so ambiguous?
  14. Imprecator Civis Illustris

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    Conficere is fine for "kill" as far as I know. As an example,

    (Poor Horace is pestered by a persistent sycophant)
    "Do you have a mother who needs you to be safe, or relatives?" "I have nobody. I've buried them all." "They are fortunate! Now I remain. Kill me; for a tragic destiny presses upon me which the divine Sabella, after she shook her urn, sung of as an old woman to (me as) a boy."
  15. Bitmap Civis Illustris

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    I wouldn't understand it in a sentence like this
  16. Imprecator Civis Illustris

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    Oh... I really should have read your posts in detail there. Is there any particular reason why, though?
  17. Manus Correctrix QVAE CORRIGIT

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    There’s just not very much context. Why use something vague when something clear is just as easy? This is prose.
  18. socratidion Civis Illustris

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    Now I'm attacking my own suggestion... I'm not so bothered that 'conficio' is used in other senses completely; I'm more bothered that even in this sense it doesn't always mean actually 'kill', but often just 'bring near the point of death'. An old man may be 'confectus aetate' but it doesn't mean he's dead. He's weakened, broken, impaired. If that sense creeps in to this phrase, it, um, weakens it. 'What doesn't knacker you makes you stronger'. Just not quite the same thing.
  19. Manus Correctrix QVAE CORRIGIT

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    Aaaanyway, does anyone have any remaining objection to my last offering, as a final translation for the OP?
  20. socratidion Civis Illustris

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    Fine by me.

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