the journey is the purpose, the journey is freedom

By Virginia, in 'English to Latin Translation', Jul 8, 2012.

  1. Virginia New Member

    Hallo again!
    I have another question:
    1. How can I translate the phrases "the journey is the purpose" and "the journey is freedom"?
    2. I also need them for a tattoo
    3. "The journey is the purpose" means that it is the journey that matters, not the destination, the journey itself is actually the destination.
    "The journey is freedeom" means that you have to be free to make the journey, but also that through the journey you gain your freedom.
    4. The phrases refer to a woman.
    Thank you so much!!!
  2. Godmy Sun monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia (Cechia)
    For example:

    Etiam iter finis est - even/also the journey is the end/purpose
    ETIAM·ITER·FINIS·EST

    Iter ipsum finis ultimus - the journey itself is the very end (the ultimate purpose)
    ITER·IPSVM·FINIS·VLTIMVS

    Iter ipsum finis est - ("est" can be omitted) - the journey itself is the end/purpose
    ITER·IPSVM·FINIS·EST

    P.S.: Choice number #2 can have in the end "est" too; it makes it slightly more understandable, but just so slightly, that it is almost useless and even more for an inscription or a tattoo
    Number #1: "est" can be omitted, but it seemed to me with this one better if it stays
    Adrian likes this.
  3. Godmy Sun monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia (Cechia)
    #2 The journey is freedom:

    One option:
    iter facere - liber esse OR iter facere est liber esse - (variant with "est" and without, as I told you before) "to travel/to make a journey means/is to be free" (in both senses you mentioned)
    Adrian likes this.
  4. Virginia New Member

    thank you, Godmy!
    do you think "iter finis" (without "ipsum") is also understandable?
    or does it have to be "iter finis est" ???
    many thanks in advance!!!
  5. Godmy Sun monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia (Cechia)
    Iter - finis ...yes, kind of but it has in my opinion more possible interpretations than might be desired, maybe with that "-" between them to imply this kind of relation.
  6. Virginia New Member

    you are awesome! :)
    thank you!
    bye, from "melting" Athens
  7. Godmy Sun monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia (Cechia)
    Ah ;) Vale, amica Atheniensis!

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