Things That Dawned on You Belatedly

By Pacifica, in 'Non-Latin Talk', Nov 24, 2017.

  1. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Post here things that you suddenly realized and thought you should have noticed long ago.

    For a start: I only realized a few months ago that the word "birth" was a verbal noun from "to bear" when I read it spelled as "bearth" in Milton.
  2. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    In "out of the blue", "blue" refers to the sky.
  3. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    I am aware that the sting of an insult does not necessarily lie in its literal meaning, but 'motherfucker' seemed particularly odd -- surely every man married to a woman who had borne a child, whether his or someone else's, would fall into that category, unless the couple had decided to abandon sex for another hobby? The implication of incest didn't occur to me.
    Hemo Rusticus likes this.
  4. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
  5. Araneus Umbraticus Lector

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Norvegia
    I just realised that "The Bee Movie" is a pun.
  6. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    Not until about a month ago did I learn that in the song Knocking on Heaven's Door the lyrics go ''Knock knock knockin' on Heaven's door'' rather than ''I'm not knockin' on Heaven's door''. I suspect final consonant glottalization may be the culprit.
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Similarly, it took me a good many listens to get the eighth line of the chorus in this song:



    I was never sure what he was saying (I heard something like "mais je me relève" but that didn't seem to make sense and it didn't sound exactly like it, either) until it suddenly clicked.

    Donc je roule, roule, roule, roule, roule
    Dans les rues de ma ville
    L'arme à l’œil, la boule au ventre
    Je refais le monde avec des si
    Oui je roule, roule, roule, roule, roule
    Jusqu'au bout de la nuit
    J’accélère
    Majeur en l'air
    En insultant ta foutue maladie
  8. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    For years 'shuffled off this mortal coil' evoked an image of someone moving slowly along a spiral-shaped piece of metal, not a snake losing its skin. I don't think I'm alone in this, though.
  9. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    I'd imagined it as throwing off the constrictive metallic "coil" of life.
  10. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    I learnt less than five minutes ago that there is no good reason to use the spelling delight -- well, apart from the fact that everyone has done so since the 16th century -- and that the word has nothing to do with light.
  11. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    A few weeks ago I had this grammar question which I decided to Google and it turned out that someone had asked that same exact question on a language forum several months before! I was thrilled that I wasn't the only one who wondered about these things ... until I realised a few minutes later that I was the author of that thread. :brickwall:
    Imperfacundus, Dantius and Pacifica like this.
  12. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    :D What was your question ?
  13. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    I was asking whether it was better practice to spell verbs with '-ise' or '-ize' in Australian English. I've seen both in academic papers, and having grown up in several different countries I get a bit confused as to different versions of English.
  14. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    This is what Macquarie has to say on the topic. Assuming you feel you can trust a dictionary that would allow that page to stand in its present form. (Anyone want to play Find the Mistakes?)
  15. leonhartu Member

    Location:
    Kyyaverá
    I realized just yesterday that a brick is just a domesticated rock.

    Or is a rock just an undomesticated brick?
    Last edited by leonhartu, Dec 14, 2017
    Imperfacundus likes this.
  16. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    Well we have to first consider the question 'Is a brick a rock, or is it the other way around?' I'd say that if either of these must be defined as a subset of the other, it would have to be bricks in relation to rocks. I.e. a brick is a special type of rock- artificial, generally smooth-faced and prismatic. And so the only acceptable answer to the original question would be 'a brick is a domesticated rock'. Which is what my dictionary will say from now on.
  17. leonhartu Member

    Location:
    Kyyaverá
    That point of view only makes sense if you consider that being -artificial, generally smooth-faced and prismatic- makes one domesticated. But here I propose we to analyze it more profoundly, we cannot only consider the outside, we need to also consider the essence. Would we call a dog a domesticated wolf? Certainly, having more as foundation our culture than the thing itself. It's all about one's concept of domesticated e.g. If I were born in a place where there were only bricks and went to other place and saw, for the first time, a lot of rocks I would certainly call them undomesticated bricks rather than undomesticated rocks. Your suggestion is valid if there is any basis of avaliation before, for example: your judgement of
    subset, but this method wouldn't be philosophically acceptable (if anything is, hahahah).
  18. Iáson Cívis Illústris

    • Civis Illustris
    I never realised that fástus and fás were cognate until I looked up the vowel quantities.

    But surely bricks are generally made of baked clay, not rocks?
  19. leonhartu Member

    Location:
    Kyyaverá
    Generally, but there are also those made of rocks and I think they are quite common.
  20. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    Slaughter has laughter in it.

Share This Page

 

Our Latin forum is a community for discussion of all topics relating to Latin language, ancient and medieval world.

Latin Boards on this Forum:

English to Latin, Latin to English translation, general Latin language, Latin grammar, Latine loquere, ancient and medieval world links.