This too shall pass

By Brookerbbnsn, in 'English to Latin Translation', Nov 10, 2012.

  1. Brookerbbnsn New Member

    Im trying to get the proper translation for "this too shall pass" for a tattoo. Im finding so many diffrent ways to write it and dont know which is correct. So far I have found....

    -Et hoc transierit
    -Et hoc transibit
    -Hoc etiam transibit

    Any help is greatly appreciated, thank you
  2. Pacis puella γραμματικωτατη

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hello,

    Et hoc transibit and hoc etiam transibit are grammatically correct - though the latter may translate more accurately as "even this shall pass". Et hoc transierit = this too will have passed.

    There's another way to put it: hoc quoque transibit.

    Or even: hoc quoque transiturum = this too shall pass (implying that it is bound to pass).
    Last edited by Pacis puella, Nov 10, 2012
  3. Brookerbbnsn New Member

    Thoughts on "et hoc praeterbit"?(may have spelled that wrong). There are so many options. Its going on my skin so I just want to be 100 percent sure.
  4. Pacis puella γραμματικωτατη

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yes, this is even better actually. (You just missed one letter.)

    Hoc quoque praeteribit.
    Et hoc praeteribit.
    Hoc quoque praeteriturum.
  5. Brookerbbnsn New Member

    I think im going to go with "hoc quoque praeteriturum" Thank you so much for the help.
  6. scrabulista Praetor

    • Praetor
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Manus Correctrix likes this.
  7. Pacis puella γραμματικωτατη

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Isn't praeterire better than transire to say that something will pass away completely, be made part of the past?
  8. scrabulista Praetor

    • Praetor
    Location:
    Tennessee
    "to pass away" in that third thread means "to die." Cato confirmed that transire could mean that.
  9. Pacis puella γραμματικωτατη

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Praeterire can also be said of things... Something that passes dies a little, no? I see examples where it is used to say that time or water passes, too.
    But, well, if Cato says transire is good! We should as well choose the safe way.

    However the OLD too has this definition for praeterire: 4) (of time) To go by, pass. b) (of events, situations, etc)
  10. scrabulista Praetor

    • Praetor
    Location:
    Tennessee
    From those threads it looks like either is good.

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