THUS SPAKE ZARATHUSTRA

By Issacus Divus, in 'English to Latin Translation', Mar 7, 2019.

  1. DUN. DUUUUUUNN. DUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUN!
    Also Sprach Zarathustra!
    The name of the space song that you could never find.
    This novel changed my Life. My signature is based around Him.
    Please give an accurate translation.
    Last edited by Issacus Divus, Mar 7, 2019
  2. Godmy A Monkey

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    The Latin wiki promotes Sīc locūtus est Zōroaster which I can get behind, but Sīc dīxit Zōroaster (for example) wouldn't be impossible either.

    (In my native language "Tak pravil Zarathustra!") ;P
  3. As soon as I saw that, my face lit up! Czech!
  4. Godmy A Monkey

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    Do you know Czech? : )
  5. Now.

    Is "Sic locūtus est Zoroāster" more like "This is what Zarathustra said"?

    Is not "Sīc dīxit Zoroāster" more simple and direct? Like in the Bible, you have the straightforward " Dixit Deus".

    I'm not the best speaker, but I've been in the West Slavic languages all of my life. It filled me with absolute joy to see that.

    But Wow! Had I known, I would've given a Rád jsem vás poznal!
  6. Godmy A Monkey

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    In Latin dīcō, dīcere (<-dīxit) is usually transitive, therefore it means to "say" (in sense of say something), it has also an intransitive meaning in a sense to "give a speech", "sīc dīxit" especially as a phrase is used often across Latin Literature.

    Loquor, loquī means to speak, and is usually intransitive, just the action of speaking, but more in the sense of a dialogue or a not so important monologue (like, to have a speech in the senate wouldn't be a fitting use for loquor, but the intransitive use of dīcō, dīcere would). "sīc locūtus" is also quite frequent phrase (maybe a bit less). So, in one sense loquor, loquī is a more straightforward translation, but in the other sense/in the sense of phraseology and some deeper lexicology, dīcō, dīcere is just as good...

    Now, I quite like sīc dīxit here, but I questioned Vicipaedia purely for the reason of giving me perhaps a translation that has been either 1) already used in some Latin literature 2) or a term made by Nietzschze himself since he was a classical philologist... but I haven't found any reference for the translation on the wiki, so I don't know. Both translations should be good, but by the sound I more like the one I supplied (too).

    Therefore I suppose most of your childhood/teenagehood (if your age you display in your profile doesn't lie).

    Awesome! :)

    Díky, ale na fóru netřeba mi vykat :) Rád jsem Tě taky poznal.
  7. Ah. That made my day. See you when I see you, which might be really soon. "Chci, abychom byli ptel."
  8. Godmy A Monkey

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    ;)

    ptel, is that a typo? přáteli?
  9. Oof. Sorry bout that. You get it, though.

    See, I was going to type přáteli, but I stuck with the grammatically incorrect quote. Will correct next time.

    By the way, have you read Tak pravil Zarathustra?
    Godmy likes this.
  10. Godmy A Monkey

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    ^No problem!

    I haven't unfortunately, but I heard several lectures on Nietzschze's philosophy... I'm the kind of guy who likes to read the stuff in the original language (Greeks in Greek, English literature in English), I suppose once I gained a more fluent command of written German, I would give it a shot :)

  11. I haven't read it. But, like you, I'm very familiar with it, and I know a lot about Nietzsche's ( and people say Czech last names are weird?) philosophy. I tried to find it in the bookstore, but I literally could not find it. I could only find a book with excerpts from it. Good enough, for now.

    (I take that back. Yeah. Some Czech stuff is pretty weird XD)
  12. Godmy A Monkey

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    :D
    ^ I see

    Yeah, I liked one lecture that went to the depth on the übermensch - that is often misunderstood or misconstrued (certainly by Nazis) that what Nietzsche had really in mind is so so distant from what we primitively imagine under the label "superman". (not thinking now just the comic book imagery, of course) - or what Nazis did.
  13. Oh yes. His sister twisted His words to support the Nazi regime, in such primitive terms too, like you said. His mind was thinking of a concept so high over that. The Übermensch, the Raised One. The Man who is God, and decides his own fate. Thus Spake Zarathustra.

    That was a little overboard, but I'm real passionate about Nietzsche. :)
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  14. Godmy A Monkey

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    :hat:

    Not at all! Just the fact that he was a classical philologist (a Latinist pretty much by his academic degrees) makes him double-interesting for me!
  15. Yeah! What a perfect subject of study! Nietzsche had such an interesting philosopher, but everything else is interesting too.
    His love for the classical, Him being able to translate his work to Latin and the like. Amazing, to say the least.
  16. Godmy A Monkey

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    Ah, right, he wrote Latin too, I forgot! I should read some of that certainly!

    ^the double posts is a kind of bug, the second one (or the first one?) usually disappears after the page refresh.

    Technical Assistant Edit: Some posts have been merged to address this issue.
    Last edited by Iohannes Aurum, Mar 10, 2019
  17. Yea. It's quite strange, refreshing it usually works though.

    But yes, consider yourself among the luckiest if you can read Nietzsche's Latin without a dictionary! I would love to be more fluent in Latin to read his works.
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  18. Godmy A Monkey

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    Use that as your motivation to progress in Latin! Get his works in Latin now, try to read bits, spend some time upon it, frustrate yourself with non-undertanding... and then study Latin aside and keep going back to it after some intervals (a month, let's say) and see how easier and easier it gets. That's how I did it with many works that had cought my interest in www.thelatinlibrary.com - I would get frustrated and go away... but I kept coming back, until it was easy one day ;) One day I opened a super difficult classical Latin work... and I just read it ;)

    The key to success almost in any discipline is keep coming back to the failed challenges. And I can attest to that in Latin too!
    Issacus Divus likes this.
  19. "Failure is not losing the fight. Failure is putting down your sword."

    Well, Friend. If you excuse me, I've got some reading to do. sbohem.
    Godmy likes this.
  20. Godmy A Monkey

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    sbohem taky, jdu spat :)

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