1. Pentheus33 New Member

    Just looking for the Latin equivalent of the English "[Something] makes sense." I've considered "sensum habet" or "sequitur," but I'm not at all sure either of those carry the logical meaning of our "making sense." "Rectum esse videtur," even? I don't know.

    Thanks!
  2. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    RECTVM·ESSE
    "to make sense'
  3. socratidion Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    London
    There are two contexts in which I might say 'makes sense': I might be talking on a linguistic level -- say, trying to work out a tough sentence in Latin (or someone's bad Latin homework), and finding it didn't make sense. Or I might mean it in the wider sphere of human action, where such and such a phenomenon had logical coherence, or was explicable rationally.

    'rectum esse' just means 'to be correct'. I don't think this really nails it -- it might just work in a pale sort of way if you wrote me some Latin and asked 'does that make sense?', and I said 'yes it does', because I'd just be telling you it was correct Latin. But what you usually need is something that says 'is reasonable/understandable'.

    Not that I have the perfect answer up my sleeve. It'll be something to do with 'ratio' (=reason), or possibly 'sensus' (=sense), but the precise form will depend on how you're actually going to use it, and in what context. But for example: 'it makes sense to kill Caesar' would perhaps come out as 'Caesarem necare ratio est'. The kind where you say 'those words don't make sense' could be something like 'verba illa obscura, neque aliquid sensus habent'.
  4. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    I like socratidion's line of thinking. I am more interested in the everyday usage of the phrase "It makes sense" as in "It makes sense to exercise every day" or "That plan just makes no sense."

    For "It makes sense" I would be inclined to say "Ratio inest." So "Ratio inest ut nos cotidie exerceamur." "In illo consilio ratio omnino quidem abest."

    It makes a lot of sense. = Multa ratio inest.

    Do others have corrections or other suggestions?
  5. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Well I see after a little exploration that it might be better to use consentaneum est.

    From L&S:

    b. Consentaneum est, it agrees with something, it is according to reason, fitting, consistent, proper, etc.

    (a). With inf., with or without dat. : quid consentaneum sit ei dicere, qui, etc., Cic. Off. 3, 33, 117: cum diceret, ei aliquid dicere consentaneum esse, id. Ac. 2, 9, 28: non est consentaneum, qui metu non frangatur, eum frangi cupiditate, id. ib. 1, 20, 68; id. N. D. 2, 15, 42; id. Tusc. 5, 9, 25.—

    (b). With ut, * Plaut. Bacch. 1, 2, 31.
  6. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada

    That's what occurred to me as well.
  7. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    There's also the phrase sibi vult = to mean something. Now, whether one can say Vultne sibi aliquid? and have that still make sense (lol) as an idiom, I don't know.
  8. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    That isn't quite the same as "to make sense", I know, but in some contexts it might work.
  9. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I think sibi vult in that sense is pretty much only used in questions, like quid hoc sibi vult?
  10. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    Well, vultne (hoc) sibi aliquid? is a question. :p

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