1. Lenny New Member

    Hello everyone!

    I’m looking to get “Trust in time” translated.

    The meaning behind this is basically trust that timing will work out in your favor so try not to stress over what you can’t control.

    Thank you in advance!
  2. R. Seltza Active Member

    Location:
    Terra Solis Lapsi
    Did you intend on conveying this phrase in an abstract sense such as "to trust in time" or did you intend on this phrase being like a command that someone should trust in time?
  3. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    Also, if a command, is it addressed to a single person or multiple people?
  4. Lenny New Member

    I intend it on being like a command! Kind of like a reminder to myself.

    I would, however, greatly appreciate a translation to address both a single person and multiple people :)
  5. R. Seltza Active Member

    Location:
    Terra Solis Lapsi
    (As a command to one person) "Trust in time" = fide in tempore
    (As a command to multiple people) "Trust in time" = fidite in tempore
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    It would be more correct without the in.
    Godmy likes this.
  7. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    However weird it seems, Latin uses for fīdō/fīdere either with a dative or bare ablative.

    So, the correct phrase would be e.g. fīde temporī or in plural fīdite temporī

    Edit: Pacifica wrote that first.
  8. R. Seltza Active Member

    Location:
    Terra Solis Lapsi
    This does seem kinda weird. Is there any particular reason why it's like this?
  9. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Do you perhaps want something closer to "trust in the (good) alternations that time will bring about"? If so, consider something like

    Crede felicibus temporum vicibus.

    = Trust in the favorable alternations of the times.
  10. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    The dative is not so weird, it's quite natural, the ablative... well, it's the locative part of the ablative, just without the preposition and it probably stayed like that historically because of reasons xy... examples to be seen in dictionaries. ; )
  11. R. Seltza Active Member

    Location:
    Terra Solis Lapsi
    Lol thanks a lot dictionaries... ;)
    Godmy likes this.

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