Tuomoniae in Hibernia, familiam à pietate, doctrina, & hospitalitate à multis saeculis notam...

By Bruodinus, in 'Latin to English Translation', Oct 26, 2014.

  1. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    By the way, could you rescan the part about "in seu duras" ?
  2. Bruodinus Member

  3. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    So it was in fact inediâ crebrâ in se durus, "[and he was] merciless toward himself with his frequent fasting".
    I had the two parts translated separately, but based on the accent marks they go together.
  4. Bruodinus Member

    ok many thanks - I noted that and thanks for re-checking this point. ;)

    Do you intend to try the next paragraph or is that to be left to someone else?
  5. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    It's coming...
    Bruodinus likes this.
  6. Bruodinus Member

  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    You missed part of the sentence here, Infacunde.

    "he led such a life, that he was an example for the new brethren cloistered with him, and an object of admiration for the others who enjoyed a freer air".
    A bit of confusion here too, it should be:

    "He silently decided in himself to quench the insatiable thirst he felt for the salvation of souls, with which he was always burning, by shedding his own blood if he could not slake it otherwise."
    I think ursit is a bit stronger than "ask"; more like "urge" or "insist". Posset should probably translate as "be allowed" here, and "with the permission" be part of the purpose/request clause. You also forgot to translate agonizanti.

    "Therefore he insisted to be allowed, with the kind permission of his superiors, to return to his homeland ravaged by the fury of apostates, in order to help the embattled and almost dying Catholic cause."
    You just fogot to translate Deo ita disponente here.
    Infacundus and Bruodinus like this.
  8. Bruodinus Member

    many thanks indeed for all that Pacis.:) How best should Deo ita disponente be translated in this context?
  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Something like "as God thus decided".

    once those were passed, as God thus decided, he reached...

    Other formulations must be possible, but this is the one that came to me now, and that's the idea in any case.
  10. Bruodinus Member

    that's brilliant Pacis - thanks indeed.;)
  11. limetrees Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Hibernia
    Bruodinus, just looking at your text here: you're not anywhere near Cork are you? I know there are people in the history dept. down there (and in Irish also maybe) working on this stuff (or very similar), and they might be interested in the texts you are digging up.
    How and why did you decide to translate this stuff anyway?
  12. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    Thanks Pacis, I appreciate it

    By the way:
    A few lines were missing from the middle, which reveals why contendit was there
    Meaning
  13. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Ah, quotidiana flagellatione in corpus contendit and the whole formulation did look a bit weird somehow.
  14. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    Paragraph two, unpolished:

    Moments after he set foot on his native soil, Bruodinus, after deservedly thanking the gods above, set about eagerly sowing the seeds of Catholic truth among his kinsmen and acquaintances (among whom, as is still the case, there were as many Bruodini as there are professors of the Catholic faith in the whole of Thomond) who were starved of pastors, by banishing the rantings of heretics from the pulpits, by explaining the basic principles of his ancient religion, by tirelessly carrying out the sacraments necessary for salvation, so that through his diligence Catholics throughout all of Thomond’s baronies, or circles, would receive a great bounty of spiritual nourishment. While Dermitius labored in this fashion, by word and by example, for many years in the Lord’s vineyard, and left the scent of fame sprinkled in his wake wherever he went, the enemy of mankind’s salvation endeavored (through Elizabeth's heretical agents) to thwart Dermitius’ undertakings and progress. Various stalkers, rather vile types, kept watch in a number of places in Thomond, waiting to ambush our miracle-worker (who, as one who burned with a very keen desire for martyrdom, would have put himself in plain sight of the enemy long ago, had he not been stopped by his superiors’ orders and given pause by the beseeching of the Catholics, for whom he was as dear as their own hearts, that he take great care to keep himself safe) as he attended to his business.
    Bruodinus likes this.
  15. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Are you having problems to edit your posts, Infacunde?
  16. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    Yeah
  17. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    We've had that problem before. Perhaps because you weren't frequenting the forum at that period, it happened that they didn't fix it for your account. Maybe you should complain here.
  18. Bruodinus Member

    Infacundas - that's really good - many thanks indeed for giving this a go :):)
    I just wonder, in this context, is 'gods' the best translation here? It would seem a strange thing to say from a Franciscan and, evidently, a monotheist! It might just be a figurative phrase, but nonetheless it strikes me as slightly odd

    Anyway, thank you once again.;)
  19. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    The author was clearly well-read in Latin, and he may have adopted terms like superi (gods above) without thinking much of the polytheistic implications.
  20. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Or perhaps he reinterpreted it as god and his angels and saints?

    But anyway it's also possible they used it as a fixed expression; I remember myself reading something like dis iuvantibus in a quite christian text and finding it funny as well.

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