turn your face to the sun and let the shadows fall behind u

By morningstar, in 'English to Latin Translation', Jan 20, 2011.

  1. morningstar New Member

    turn your face to the sun and let the shadows fall behind you

    please help if you can translate this accurately its for my tattoo so its important i get it right
    thankyou x
  2. Godmy Sun monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia (Cechia)
    My version:
    Ad solem esto vertus umbraeque post te iaceant - Always face to the sun and let the shadows lie behind you...
  3. Imprecator Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Colchis
    I'd put it as obtutum contra solem teneas ut tenebrae post te iaceant.

    -Esto vertus = be turned (by someone else)
    -"Let the shadows fall behind you" isn't an impersonal jussive, it literally means "allow the shadows to..."
  4. Godmy Sun monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia (Cechia)
    About iaceant: Yea, probably... but in latin (as far I as know) by means of the present subjunctive both forms can be said (at least from what I've seen so far) - maybe if I said that "ut iaceant" then it'd be closer to the OP's sentence.
  5. morningstar New Member

    wow quite confuzing , thankyou both very much ,
    as Esto vertus = be turned (by someone else) i'd need it to be , me turning myself because im turning away from the darkness i've been through and moving on . so, obtutum contra solem teneas ut tenebrae post te iaceant. seems to be closer

    but as you two are much more experienced i hope you can decide on which one is best suitable

    i really appreciate this
    morningstar x
  6. Godmy Sun monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia (Cechia)
    Hmm, well you can use either my version modified a little:
    Ad solem es versus ut umbrae post te iaceant
    or Es adversus solem ut umbrae post te iaceant - these two are identical

    (I also used incorrectly vertus instead of versus, I wanted of course the preposition)

    or Imprecator's: Obtutum contra solem teneas ut tenebrae post te iaceant.

    They both express the same thing I believe...
  7. morningstar New Member

    would this work???

    Obtutum contra solem ,ut umbrae post te iaceant

    x
  8. Imprecator Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Colchis
    Without the ut it wouldn't be a conditional.

    Looks ok, except that ad is unnecessary.
  9. Godmy Sun monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia (Cechia)
    UT phrases don't make necessarily ONLY conditionals as far as I know, it's only more polite iussive

    In many books in the first chapters about present subjunctive you see just easy examples like: "ut laudes" = "let you praise" .. et cetera (not from my head and not just from one source).
    Nevertheless in my second example I really used conditional (you had inspired me).
  10. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Saxonia
    it could be understood as a medio passive ("turn yourself"; at least if you put versus there), which could replace a construction with a reflexive pronoun (like te verte). The imperative esto + PPP is really strange, though. I don't know what's wrong with a simple construction like "te verte"

    I'm not sure about the contra. It sounds kind of hostile to me (at least it often has that connotation of opposition) - why not simply ad solem?

    they really look strange to me for the reasons mentioned above. Apart from the weird imperative (that should at least be esto, so as to make clear it is an imperative) it should also be "ad solem" or "soli" in the second sentence.

    You mean final clause, don't you?

    I'd be curious to see those books because I can't think of any instance where ut introduces a main clause in the subjunctive. It is true that final sentences with ut and ne probably developed out of independent clauses that were later subordinated, but they were not independent in classical Latin anymore. Sometimes they stand alone in reported speech, but in such cases they always depend on a verb of speaking that was either mentioned beforehand or has to be imagined. "(tibi dicit) ut laudes" = he tells you to praise
  11. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Saxonia
    I'm really curious where you guys have this terminology from because VT doesn't introduce conditional clauses at all
  12. Imprecator Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Colchis
    I meant to say purpose clause there- occasionally I confuse english grammatical terms. Obiter, what is the problem with contra? I don't see why the reader would interpret this in a hostile sense when the context is so clear.
  13. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Saxonia
    Because contra just isn't used like this. In it's merely local sense it is usually found to describe the position of persons and places towards each other and is used with words like stare or situs/positus esse - without this clarification, it often goes beyond its local meaning to express hostility/ opposition. Again, I'm just judging from my experience, so if you have found it used the way you did somewhere, I will stand corrected, of course. Per se, it's probably not wrong, anyway - ad just seems to be the more common choice here
  14. Godmy Sun monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia (Cechia)
    About "ad solem versus": My book says, that adversus + acc can be said as ad + acc versus(indecl.)
    That was all.

    About the UT thing - I will search for it.. only sources I have by my hand are some czech courses and a textbook-scanned from 1901.

    About "esto": Originally I used esto actually.
  15. yellowmustard New Member

    "Turn your face to the Sun, and the shadows fall behind you"

    Being now 36, I have nearly forgotten all the Latin I learnt in school...

    I'm getting a tattoo, which is kind of personal, but is important to me. I want it to say:

    "Turn your face to the Sun, and the shadows fall behind you"

    If you could help I would be very grateful, also if you could let me know where the first clause ends that would be great, since I want it on two lines. If you Cant one line is still a great help.

    :)
  16. yellowmustard New Member

    Can someone clear this up with a final translation? thanks
  17. Iynx Consularis

    • Consularis
    I'm not sure there is such a thing as "a final translation"; There are many ways this could be said. I'd suggest:

    Vultus tuus ad solem vertatur, recidanturque a tergo umbrae.

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