Unless you're prepared to die, You're not prepared to live.

By ConanTdabitur, in 'English to Latin Translation', Jun 6, 2016.

  1. ConanTdabitur New Member

    INTERESTED TO HAVE THIS PHRASE TRANSLATED AS A PERSONAL MOTTO, WHICH A LIFE SKILL COACH ENCOURAGED ME TO FORMULATE.
    INTENDED TO BE USED TO REPLACE CURRENT FAMILY MOTTO OF 'AUT MORS AUT GLORIA'.
    Thanks.
    RCW
  2. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    Vivere imparatus qui imparatus mori, or such.

    More literally, vivere imparatus es nisi paratus mori.
  3. ConanTdabitur New Member

    Thank you very much for this translation !
    Please forgive my retarded reply !! Had lost the thread and page!

    I had had: "nisi paratus mori, non vivere" as a possible translation by a college friend, but wanted possible alternative . What think you?

    I do enjoy the rhythm of the first ---perhaps not as absolute, but is "he who does not live does not die", yes?
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    It isn't very good.
    No... The literal meaning is "He is unprepared to live who is unprepared to die". I think it would be better as non est vivere paratus qui non est paratus mori, though.
  5. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Economically expressed:

    imparatus morti, imparatus vitae

    = not prepared for death, not prepared for life.

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