"Watertank" and add ons

By Issacus Divus, in 'English to Latin Translation', May 15, 2019.

  1. Ok. So I'm not sure where to post this question, but what I'm trying to ask is this:
    Is there any attested construction in Latin to make compound words (more like the Germanic languages?) I'm not sure if you can do that in Latin.
  2. legio septima Member

    Issacus Divus likes this.
  3. Lol, I meant unusual attested compounds, but I appreciate the links nonetheless. Maybe I'll find the answer in there.
  4. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena

    I thought I've seen one or two examples, before, but I have nothing concrete in mind right now ... if anything comes back to my mind, I'll let you know :p it's certainly not the most usual way to do it in Latin.
  5. Undoubtedly! That's what got me thinking about this in the first place; I remember comparing Germanic compounds with Latin's constructions, and now I'm wondering how it would look like in Latin.
  6. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena

    Germanic compounds in Latin would either be done with genitive constructions or with adjectival construction.

    I can think of quite a few Neo-Latin words, like pediludium (= football) that are rather compound-like ... but I think that they A) sound stupid and were B) probably invented by German people :p
    Callaina and Issacus Divus like this.
  7. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Not a compound in that way, but still a rather unusual formation for a compound word: Nerei repandirostrum incurvicervicum pecus from Pacuvius, describing dolphins.
    Callaina likes this.
  8. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    Interesting; I'd never before heard of the guy.
  9. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    His works only survive in fragments so he doesn't have much reason to come up unless you're specifically studying Roman tragedy or fragments of early authors, I guess.
  10. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Plautus seems to do it. There are some more obvious examples, but stultiloquium comes to mind.
  11. Hemo Rusticus The Lizard King

    • Civis Illustris
    He does it with gusto. Come to think of it, the fact that both the Greek and Roman comedians (the latter following suit) used these words to get a couple of laughs, specially those with plenty of short syllables (your 'stultiloquium' or 'ferricrepinus'), is pretty telling.
  12. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    I wonder if he isn't getting the laughs from pretending to be Greek.
    Hemo Rusticus likes this.
  13. That made me laugh.

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