1. Trethiwr Member

    Location:
    Dumnonia
    This isn't for me, but it sort of is now because my curiosity is piqued.
    A friend on Facebook had used ... g***le and was given the result "Quld?"
    As he explained, to clarify, that is a single word "Q U L D"
    He was more interested to know if QULD was even a word than his original translation.
    I confess, I am curious too.

    I would also like to know what the right translation of the phrase is because most seem to be suggested "Quid sum" but I can't help thinking that isn't right, although I haven't the faintest idea why.
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Quid sum? is correct.

    Quld isn't a Latin word, but it's obviously a typo for quid, meaning "what".
  3. Trethiwr Member

    Location:
    Dumnonia
    Yep, we all pretty much thought, for sure, quld is not a word in Latin, or indeed any language.
    I realise my ignorance of Latin is quite profound but I sort of assumed "quid sum" would be more naturally "what I am?"
    (following Cogito ergo sum - I think therefore I am.)
    Of course word order in English is word order in English.
    I just thought there would be some inflection in Latin to clarify the meaning intended?
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    No, sum can just translate to "I am" or "am I" as required by the context. If it's in a declarative sentence as in cogito ergo sum, it will (most of the time) be "I am", and if it's in a direct question, it will be "am I" to conform to English rules, but the Latin word sum doesn't change.
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    However, "what I am" would translate differently anyway — it can basically translate two different ways depending on context — but this would be long to explain.

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