What are you reading?

By Dido, in 'Non-Latin Talk', Dec 16, 2012.

  1. Dido Active Member

    Me: nothing at the moment (except for my Latin coursebook ;))

    But I ordered these:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]
    Last edited by Dido, Dec 16, 2012
    Matthaeus and Godmy like this.
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Thegani vita Hludowici imperatoris lol... It's short. Almost finished.
  3. Kosmokrator Active Member

    Location:
    Pléroma
    St. Ambrose of Milan De Officiis Ministrorum
  4. henriquefb Active Member

    Location:
    Brazil
    I'm reading Caesar's Civil Wars (unfortunately in English... but this'll change!!!)
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Maybe you should read both Latin and English at the same time. I mean you compare both and with the help of the English translations that give you the general meaning, you try parsing the sentences.
    henriquefb likes this.
  6. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Henry,
    I know there are bilingual versions of Commentari de Bello Gallico and Bellum Helveticum (available for free) on the net. I am not sure but I believe either on google books or archive.org
    Moreover, on archive.org you can find works of ceasar with comprehensive comments regarding vacabulary and syntax.
    I have recently been reading this book: Cornelius Marshal Lowe; Butler, Nathaniel, Bellum Helveticum for beginners in Latin an introduction to the reading of Latin authors, based on the inductive method (available on archive org - this is a progressive course developing practical reading skills based on Bellum Helveticum).
    Hope to have been of any assistance to you in this matter.
    henriquefb likes this.
  7. henriquefb Active Member

    Location:
    Brazil
    Thanks PP and Adrian! My edition of the De Bello Civili is indeed bilingual. I bought it used on Amazon for quite a good price. I don't know if you are acquainted with the Loeb Classical Library, but I think people here would just love it. All the main classical greek and latin texts with a nice hardcover binding and bilingual editions.
    http://www.hup.harvard.edu/collection.php?cpk=1031
    And most surely I'll check out the Bellum Helveticum for beginners. Thanks for the tip!
  8. Decimvs Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    [IMG]
  9. Dido Active Member

    Or maybe on textkit :agree2:
  10. George Arnold Member

    Location:
    Netherlands
    Several e-books which I have installed on my e-reader:

    Contes d'Andersen en Français

    Mille Fabulae in Latin
    Catullus in Latin

    Fidessa by Louis Couperus in Dutch
    Psyche by Louis Couperus in Dutch
    Vos Reynaerde in Medieval Dutch
    Beatrijs in Medieval Dutch

    And of course not at the same time.
    Dido likes this.
  11. Dido Active Member

    "Van dichten comt mi cleine bate
    Die liede raden mi dat ict late"

    :D

    Why are you reading those medieval Dutch books? (I studied Dutch language and culture at university and read them as well). Have you read De reis van sint Brandaan yet? :)
  12. George Arnold Member

    Location:
    Netherlands
    Why Medieval Dutch?
    It is a great help to understand Modern Dutch but it also creates a linguistic doorway to other Germanic languages.
    And I am not focusing on spelling but mostly on pronunciation. So I read Medieval Dutch aloud to be able to understand.
    It enriches my sense for linguistic or should I simply say languages.

    Colours-Kleuren-Farben-Verven-Mahlen-Draaien-Drehen (verven malen)
    Rider-Ridder-Knight-Knecht
    Hoor-Whore-Hoer-Hoeri (Hoeri means woman in Farsi)
    Flicker-Flikker-Flicka (Flicka means girl in Swedish)

    So one simple basic word can be pronounced a slightly different and its meaning differs completely depending on several factors.
    I am quite aware of the fact I may use exactly the same written/pronounced words with different meanings i.e. for others to be regarded as different.
  13. Halfdan New Member

    I'm mostly on language grammars at the moment:
    Vickner, EDW. J. A Brief Swedish Grammar, 1914
    Rask, Erasmus. A Grammar of the Icelandic or Old Norse Tongue, 1843
  14. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I'm searching for something to read. Hesitating.
  15. Dido Active Member

    What kind of books do you like?
  16. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    In French or English a little everything but especially historical novels and road books or apocalyptic s-f... And also things about history and linguistics in general. But right now I'm looking for something in Latin...
  17. Kosmokrator Active Member

    Location:
    Pléroma
    I may suggest the Historia de duobus amantibus by Enea Silvio Piccolomini (Pius II)
  18. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Where do I find that? Is it in the Latin Library?

    Edit: Doesn't seem to be there.

    Edit2: Found it in Google.
    Last edited by Pacis puella, Dec 17, 2012
  19. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    That seems to be a funny thing for a pope to write... :) But I guess maybe the lovers will be "Catholically" punished in the end... :(.
  20. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    At the moment (book recommended latetly by my lecturer - studying for exam from theory of organisation and management; also due to carrier progession):
    James M. Kouzes, Barry Z. Posner, Elaine Biech, A Coach's Guide to Developing Exemplary Leaders. Making the Most of The Leadership Challenge and the Leadership Practices Inventory

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