What are you reading?

By Dido, in 'Non-Latin Talk', Dec 16, 2012.

  1. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    A good choice. If you want a slightly more interesting version, Paul the Deacon wrote an expanded version of Eutropius, which adds more detail to the 10 books and adds 5 new books at the end. The difficulty can vary, but it's usually around the same difficulty as the original Eutropius.
  2. Discens Discipulus Member

    Thanks; I didn't know about his Historia Romana, I'll give that a try.
  3. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    I think Clifford Moore called his later style in the Annals, ultra compression. I'd have to check the Loeb introduction to the Annals but it was something like that.
  4. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    I can't access this info from their website but I have the books on the shelf so I'll check when I get back. It might be worth you looking at his notes on the text, Dantius as I'm sure there's some good pointers in there for readers of the verso.
    Last edited by Hawkwood, Aug 27, 2017
  5. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    It is indeed very compressed and elliptical in many parts.
  6. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I mentioned on another thread that I'm reading the first half of Suetonius. So far I've re-read Julius and I'm in the process of re-reading Augustus (I got around 80 chapters in out of 101 last time). It's a lot more enjoyable this time around now that I don't have to do so much tedious looking up of vocabulary. I've heard that there is some very nice writing towards the end of Nero. Araneus, perhaps you should try Suetonius again. Also, the second half is much briefer (and thus, in my opinion, more interesting). Since Galba, Otho, and Vitellius didn't really have time to do anything like financial reforms most of their biographies are just their ascension to the throne and their death, and snippets about their characters. He also reports some pretty funny omens in Galba.
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Othello.
  8. Araneus Umbraticus Lector

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Norvegia
    Yeah, I've been meaning to.Things are just going so slowly with me nowadays. I barely have time and energy to read 100-200 lines in the Aeneid each day. In the middle of book 9 now.
  9. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I'm planning to read the Aeneid after I'm done with Tacitus and Suetonius. Unfortunately school is starting soon for me so I'm worried that I won't have as much time for reading as I've had this summer.
  10. AoM Rosa Caerula

    • Civis Illustris
    Using any commentaries?
  11. Hemo Rusticus Member

    Location:
    Scurrarum Urbs
    Just picked up A History of the Order of the Temple by Malcolm Barber. Should be pretty gnarly.
  12. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I'm done with Suetonius. There's a lot of very funny (and some rather disturbing) anecdotes about Caligula and Nero.
  13. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Twelfth Night.
  14. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I guess I should start Annales book 2 again.
  15. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    Seneca's Thyestes
  16. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Araneus read that a while back, I believe. Seneca's tragedies seem interesting – they might be the first thing I read when I get to Seneca.
  17. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    Regarding Seneca's tragedies, does he make use of anagnorisis? I've still not read a translation of a single roman play.
  18. Etaoin Shrdlu Imminent wormfood

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Ruritania
    Thyestes. Oedipus. It's all about the anagnorisising. I wouldn't recommend reading them in English, though, unless you have a masochistic streak.
  19. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    An English translation is my single option. Oedipus, well that's interesting straight off the bat. I'll have a look at his take on Sophocles' stuff. Have to say I'm with Aristotle on this one, there's nowt better than bearing witness to the protagonist's moment of dreadful realization.
  20. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    It's supposedly used in comedy as well but I'm too sure to what effect as I'm not really driven enough to read/watch one.

    Edit: Well I suppose to comical effect but surely it can't have the same potency. Without looking into it I suspect anagnorisis belongs to tragedy first and foremost.
    Last edited by Hawkwood, Sep 15, 2017

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