when did latin die?

By Aquilina, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', Oct 6, 2013.

  1. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    Bestiola likes this.
  2. Bestiola Speculatrix

    • Praetor
    • Praeco
    If you add a bit of chilli, it will be almost like true ancient xocolatl Aztecs would make :)
    Hawkwood likes this.
  3. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    Bestiola likes this.
  4. Bestiola Speculatrix

    • Praetor
    • Praeco
    Hah, I don't think my own "shitbagz" would love it either :)/www.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/swytefirizvgcowi/p1/>

    Well the modern version of the original recipe would be something along the lines of mixing water, unsweetened coffee, chilli and a bit of vanilla extract.

    Too bad for the Romans that they didn't know about xocolatl.
  5. Hawkwood .

    • Civis
    Copied and pasted and Googled and now I want one.
    Bestiola likes this.
  6. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Pop music and junk food don't contain deadly viruses though.
    Who cares about learning Finnish anyway.
    Bestiola likes this.
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I heard recently on TV that here in Belgium the number of diabetes cases has doubled something like these last 10 or 15 years - I don't remember exactly, but DOUBLED, shit.
    Claudilla likes this.
  8. Claudilla Active Member

    Location:
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Hawkwood, my paternal grandmother had adult diabetes, my father was careful and never developed and neither have I. No fizzy drinks. Keep sweets and treats to once a week or 2 weeks and tell him not to eat them if others give them to him. I had only some kind of health type fig cookie as a child except for treat. And yes I have a horrible sweet tooth but I don't yield to it,I have dried fruit in my house (dates, figs). Junk food is ruining children's health in the US children's obesity and diabetes is off the chart due to foul diets of fast & junk food.

    Yes, well strive for a Cato approaching attitude;)
  9. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Especially beating up slaves like they were punchbags lol.
    Bestiola likes this.
  10. Claudilla Active Member

    Location:
    Chapel Hill, NC
    And it's still happening to women across continents....Rome was quite civilized I'd take it any day over being a woman in developing countries.
  11. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    How the topic veered...
  12. Bestiola Speculatrix

    • Praetor
    • Praeco
    If you were a slave woman, then not so much...
    Aurifex likes this.
  13. Claudilla Active Member

    Location:
    Chapel Hill, NC
    many slave women eventually could buy their freedom and then become citizens, they were bakers, dyers, fullers, hairdressers...they could own their property and even when slaves could marry other slaves and have children. The entire patron-client relationship. I think that's a better deal than being female in a lot of places, where there is sex slavery, no rights etc...
  14. Bestiola Speculatrix

    • Praetor
    • Praeco
    Hmmm:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_ancient_Rome

    So, cca 5 million people had no personal rights, were not even considered persons and were just meat to be used for whatever purpose. Sure, some might have been freed and even became rich, but those were only exceptions.
    Last edited by Bestiola, Oct 17, 2014
  15. Imber Ranae Ranunculus Iracundus

    • Civis Illustris
    Though I don't disagree with the rest of this, the interpretation of servus non habet personam to mean that the Romans thought slaves 'had no personality' or weren't persons (in the modern sense of 'human beings') isn't quite sound. It just means they had no legal standing. See § II.B.2.(γ) in Lewis & Short under persona for the relevant translation of the term: 'Law t. t., a being having legal rights and obligations' (and notice that definition (δ) is called 'rare').

    This definition of 'person' is still relevant in modern legal context, as can be seen in the controversy over the term 'corporate personhood' in U.S. law. While the debate over what rights normally granted to natural persons should or should not also be granted to corporations is an important one, I've noticed there's a lot of misunderstanding by certain laymen who seem to think that the courts now consider corporations actual people, and wrongly believe that the idea of corporate personhood is something new.
    Bestiola likes this.
  16. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Some at least were conscious they were humans and had to be treated as such:

    Cum fueris proprios servos mercatus in usus,
    Et famulos dicas, homines tamen esse memento.

    Disticha Catonis.

    Not to say that it was always the case...
  17. Iohannes Aurum Technicus Auxiliarius

    • Technicus Auxiliarius
    During Saturnalia, the role of slave and master were reversed.
  18. Claudilla Active Member

    Location:
    Chapel Hill, NC
    please don't quote wikipedia....Actually until the British Married Woman's Property Act of 1882 women had no legal personality; a married woman was her husband's chattel via couverture.. And a 14 year old, brave Malala Yousafzai, gets shot by religious fantatics because she wishes an education and wins the Nobel Prize. So I'm not terribly impressed since this is about 2,000 years after Roman slavery.
  19. Abbatiſſæ Scriptor Senex

    • Civis Illustris
    Right... :confused: wow.. how far off topic can we go?:rolleyes:
    My profound apologies for whatever part I might have play'd in taking us this far afield.:(
  20. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I don't think you've played much of a part. Anyway it's no big deal in my opinion. (And now we've at least come back to discussing things relating to the Romans, even if not to the question of when Latin died. Ding-Dongs and diabetes were farther off-topic. :D)

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