Tattoo While the wicked stand confounded, call me with thy saints surrounded.

By Batuhan, in 'English to Latin Translation', Mar 9, 2019.

  1. Batuhan New Member

    Hello guys. I’m really enjoying while I’m browsing this forum and thank you for all of yours knowledge, support and respect.
    I need to correct translation for the “While the wicked stand confounded, call me with thy saints surrounded.” “Confutatis maledictis, voca me cum benedictis” I got one translation but I’m not sure if it’s correct or non.
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hello,

    It's correct. Those are the original lines from the medieval song Dies Irae, which your English lines are a translation of.

    There's originally one more line coming in between:

    Confutatis maledictis,
    Flammis acribus addictis,
    Voca me cum benedictis.

    When the wicked are confounded,
    Doomed to flames of woe unbounded,
    Call me with Thy saints surrounded.

    (See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dies_irae)

    Maybe you were aware of this but decided to shorten it so as not to get an overlong tattoo.
    Batuhan likes this.
  3. Batuhan New Member

    You mean I must get a “Confutatis maledictis, voca me cum benedictis.” this one? I’m only wondering about meanings. The both translation is the same right?
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I'm sorry, I'm not sure I understand your question, but maybe this will answer it:

    Confutatis maledictis, voca me cum benedictis is correct for "While the wicked stand confounded, call me with thy saints surrounded" as well as "When the wicked are confounded, call me with Thy saints surrounded". These two English translations vary in "while" vs. "when" and "stand" vs. "are", but that doesn't change the original Latin. The meaning stays overall the same.

    Obviously, the English verse translation of the Latin is a bit free at times. You often can't do a translation without rewording a few things, and that's even more true when you do a verse translation. The Wikipedia article that I linked also provides a more literal translation of the Latin, if you wish to know.
    Batuhan likes this.
  5. Batuhan New Member

    Thank you so much for your support and favor. I got the real point at this time.

    Sincerely yours.
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    You're welcome.

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