You are Entitled to Your Own Incorrect Opinion

By FUZZJP, in 'English to Latin Translation', Jan 4, 2019.

  1. FUZZJP New Member

    I'm looking for a translation to this phrase. I'm not sure if "You are" or "You're" is easier to translate.

    I'm looking to use this on a crest.

    Many thanks!
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I would suggest licet tibi tuam falsam opinionem habere.

    "You are" and "you're" translate the same, though the literal equivalent isn't even actually used here.
  3. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    Perhaps: Licet tibi opinionem tuam propriam, etsi pravam, habere.
  4. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada

    Just saw this now and can confirm it's correct.
  5. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    tuo jure perpere opinari tibi licet

    = by your own right you may conjecture incorrectly = you are entitled to your mistaken opinion
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Is perpere a word? I know perperam, not perpere.

    I'm not sure of the way you're using opinari, either. It seems unusual with just an adverb; I'd expect a clause indicating what the person was thinking (unless this was implied from earlier in the context). Sentire, on the other hand, is often used with just an adverbial.
  7. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    L&S approves of both perperam and perpere. The former is more common, it seems. The latter is more easily recognizable as an adverb.

    I have not yet thoroughly researched opinor but it can stand absolutely, and therefore it seems likely that it can be adverbally modified:

    itaque incognito nimirum adsentiar, id est opinabor. Cicero, Acad. II.xxxv.113

    And so I will of course not give an assent to something I do not know, that is I will hold an opinion.
    J.M likes this.
  8. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Just a brief addendum after a little research:

    I see that L&S offers from Suetonius, Aug. 51: [opinari] male de Caesare, to have a bad opinion of to think ill of . So to have an incorrect opinion could presumably be perperam opinari. But there is "de Caesare" for a specification.

    And Servius (c. 400), In Vergilii Aeneidos Libros 6.596.1

    ipse etiam Lucretius dicit per eos, super quos iamiam casurus inminet lapis, superstitiosos significari, qui inaniter semper verentur et de diis et caelo superioribus male opinantur.


    So here also it is used with a de prepositional phrase: they "have ill-founded opinions about..."

    Later Latin is ready to use phrases like ut nonnulli perperam opinantur, "as some wrongly think". See here, fifth line from bottom.
    J.M likes this.
  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    OK, it seems like your use of opinari was acceptable.

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