Love You complete me.

By Hiroki Sugimoto, in 'English to Latin Translation', Jun 5, 2019.

  1. Hiroki Sugimoto New Member

    I wanted to engrave "You complete me." on my wedding ring in Latin, and I was wondering how you properly say it. I found "Tu me completas." in Yahoo Answers, but it sounds like Spanish, so if you could help me figure it out, I would appreciate it. Thank you.
  2. Hiroki Sugimoto New Member

    Oh, one more thing. If I remember correctly, Latin is a gender specific language, so Is the phrase different when a man says it to a woman vs. a woman to a man?
  3. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    You posted with no description?

    I will give Me imples.
    Hiroki Sugimoto likes this.
  4. Laurentius Man of Culture

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Sounds a bit more like "you fill me" imho, which may not be out of context when it comes to marriage I guess but it's not what OP asked.
    Hiroki Sugimoto likes this.
  5. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    Lol.
  6. Hiroki Sugimoto New Member

    What about "Me comples"? How does that sound to you?
  7. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    Oh. For some reason, I was "ignoring" your messages, and I didn't see the description. Sorry.

    Hmm. That could mean "fill" as well, but it's probably a better choice.
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  8. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    Or perhaps expleo.
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  9. Hiroki Sugimoto New Member

    Thank you. So, how does "Me expleo" sound? I mean I do not have enough knowledge/experiences to get the nuances of each, so which one is the best choice? or is there any other Latin expression whose meaning is the closest?
  10. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    If you were going to use explain, it would be "Me exples".
    To be honest, the verb pleo, which is in explain, complex, and impleo, could mean both "I fill" and "I fulfill", so I don't think Me comples is bad.

    The Vulgate (Latin Bible) uses pleo to mean "complete" at Colossians 2:10:
    et estis in illo repleti, with "repleti" being a form of the verb repleo.
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  11. Laurentius Man of Culture

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    I wonder if some "me integrum facis" and "me integram facis" , depending on the wearer, would sound good enough.
    Hiroki Sugimoto and Bitmap like this.
  12. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Sounds fine to me.
    as alternative (tu) mihi cumulum affers - you make me complete
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  13. Hiroki Sugimoto New Member

    Thank you for your suggestions. To sum up,

    Me comples
    Me imples
    Me exples


    are all not-so-bad choices?
  14. Hiroki Sugimoto New Member


    I appreciate your suggestions. What do "me integrum facis" or "me integram facis" mean? and how are they different?
  15. Hiroki Sugimoto New Member


    Thank you. I like this one as well.
    Is the expression different when a man says it to a woman than when a woman to a man?
  16. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    me integrum facis - when a man says it to a woman
    me intergram facis - when woman says it to a man

    (tu) mihi cumulum affers - can be used by a man or a woman

    I would advise caution, these verbs refer more to "fill up" rather than "to complete"
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  17. Laurentius Man of Culture

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    "Me integrum facis" means "you make me complete" and it implies that the one who says it is a male. "Me integram facis" means the same but implies that the one who says it is a female.
    Hiroki Sugimoto likes this.
  18. Hiroki Sugimoto New Member


    Thank you! It's clear now.
  19. Hiroki Sugimoto New Member

    Thank you! For curiosity, what determines the gender of the expression? Yes, I'm a newbie here...
  20. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    in the sentence "me integrum / integram facis" ; "gender of expression" is determined by [termination/ suffix] of accusative case of adjective integer;
    integr|um - singular, masculine, accusative
    integr|am - singular, feminine, accusative

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