Tattoo You Dare Cross Me?

By J.M, in 'English to Latin Translation', Apr 14, 2019.

  1. J.M Active Member

    Salve!
    Today I would like the phrase "You dare cross me?!" to be translated into Modern Latin. It is not exactly interpreted as an insult but rather and intimidation to another person of any gender (but preferably male),
    Thank you,
    J.M
  2. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    Num audes mihi obstare?

    This works for either gender.
    Matthaeus likes this.
  3. J.M Active Member

    Salve!
    Thank you for great reply Callaina, just as helpful as always,
    J.M
  4. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    for a more colloquial tone, you could do something like Auden tu mihi obstare? I like the sound of that.
  5. J.M Active Member

    Right!, thank you Dantius!
    J.M
  6. What is auden, Dantius?
  7. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    auden = audesne.
  8. J.M Active Member

    Interesting... So would Auden refer to "dare"
    J.M
  9. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    auden = audesne = do you dare?
  10. :doh:
  11. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    When -ne is appended to a word ending in -s, it can be contracted like that:
    viden = videsne
    ain = aisne
    satin = satisne
    Similarly, -ne can be contracted when it's added to a word ending in a vowel:
    videon = videone
    meministin = meministine or meministisne
    etc.
    Issacus Divus likes this.

  12. Quite good. Thanks. I'm not sure if I ever came across that, or if I forgot.
  13. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    You see a lot of it in Plautus, for example. It wouldn't occur much (or at all) in formal writing.
  14. Suppose I should've read Casina before this.
  15. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Yeah. I've seen such forms in Persius's satires (which are a bit colloquial), and also the idiom Satin salve? for "Is everything all right?" is not uncommon in quotations in Livy and occasionally other historians. Livy also has viden. Other than those examples it's pretty much exclusively Plautus and Terence and similar authors from what I remember.
Tags: j.m

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