“I am the wolf”.

Latin Lover

New Member
Thank you so much! I appreciate it! What would the most exact translation of “lupus sum” be in English (considering it's shorter than the other)?
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Thank you so much! I appreciate it! What would the most exact translation of “lupus sum” be in English (considering it's shorter than the other)?
How about explaining the context of the phrase first, please?
(I) am a wolf. "Ego" means "I"
But whether it's better to include it or not depends highly on the context.
 

Latin Lover

New Member
“I have heard every last tale of the wolf by now. None of them are true. I am the wolf.”

People are telling stories about a certain wolf. I am that wolf. I am THE wolf.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
(I) am a wolf. "Ego" means "I"
But don't think that the sentence is incomplete if it isn't included. The "I" part is already understood in the verb sum. Ego is just an "additional" emphatic "I".

“I have heard every last tale of the wolf by now. None of them are true. I am the wolf.”

People are telling stories about a certain wolf. I am that wolf. I am THE wolf.
In this context ego sum lupus is better. If you really want to emphasize "the", since "the" doesn't really exist in Latin, you could even say ego sum lupus ille, literally "I am that wolf".
 

Latin Lover

New Member
But don't think that the sentence is incomplete if it isn't included. The "I" part is already understood in the verb sum. Ego is just an "additional" emphatic "I".
Okay, so if “lupus sum" is “I am a wolf”, what would “I am THE wolf” be? Or is there no way to emphasize on that?

In this context ego sum lupus is better. If you really want to emphasize "the", since "the" doesn't really exist in Latin, you could even say ego sum lupus ille, literally "I am that wolf".
Ah, that's wonderful. Thank you so much!
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Okay, so if “lupus sum" is “I am a wolf”, what would “I am THE wolf” be? Or is there no way to emphasize on that?
lupus sum can mean either "I am a wolf" or "I am the wolf". It just depends on the context.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus

Laurentius

Civis Illustris
Sum means "am". Personally I like the version with "ille" that Pacis provided more, it sounds closer. Or at least with "ego".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
I thought he was asking about lupus vs lupus ille. I feel that ille is hardly necessary if the context immediately precedes the phrase or is otherwise obvious.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
No, it isn't necessary. Just optional.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
If you mean "tales" as in "fables", then I'd suggest: Lupus fabularum

I unfortunately don't know the Latin equivalent of "Peter". :confused:
 
Top