“Maintain vigilance, act with wisdom..."

BlueNemes

New Member
“Maintain vigilance, act with wisdom, put justice above all else.”

and

"Love discipline and rejoice restraint, for without these man(human) is a monster more terrible than all beasts of nature"

These are to be mottoes for two different fictional organizations.
Thank you to the translators in advance :)
 

Iohannes Aurum

Technicus Auxiliarius
For the first fictional organization: Vigilantiam ten[e-long:1kywijlu][/e-long:1kywijlu], cum sapienti[a-long:1kywijlu][/a-long:1kywijlu] age, iustitia praeter omnes ceteros pone

Please wait for others to comment on the first motto and to translate the second motto.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Here's my attempt at the first one. Attentus sis, sapienter te gere, iustitiam omnibus antepone.
 

Decimus Canus

Civis Illustris
vigila, cum sapientia age, iustitiam super omne aliud pone.

disciplinam ama et in reverentia gaude, nam sine eis homo belua terribilior quam omnes bestiae naturae est.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Matthaeus dixit:
Here's my attempt at the first one. Attentus sis, sapienter te gere, iustitiam omnibus antepone.
I think this is a very good suggestion
 

voxlarsi

New Member
BlueNemes dixit:
what does "reverentia gaude" mean exactly? I thought reverentia meant reverence and gaude is joy.
I think Decimus meant for "gaude" to be the imperative of the verb gaudere, meaning "to rejoice". Reverentia could mean both reverence and restraint; remember, the english word "reverence" was adopted from latin, and not the other way around :)
 

Decimus Canus

Civis Illustris
voxlarsi dixit:
BlueNemes dixit:
what does "reverentia gaude" mean exactly? I thought reverentia meant reverence and gaude is joy.
I think Decimus meant for "gaude" to be the imperative of the verb gaudere, meaning "to rejoice". Reverentia could mean both reverence and restraint; remember, the english word "reverence" was adopted from latin, and not the other way around :)
Yes, exactly. Gaude is the command rejoice. In Latin you can't rejoice something directly (I'm not sure you really can in English) but you can rejoice in it. In reverentia can mean in respect, deference or restraint as well as in reverence. Gaudere in reverentia does seem contradictory, but to rejoice in restraint is also oxymoronical in English.
 

BlueNemes

New Member
Decimus Canus dixit:
Yes, exactly. Gaude is the command rejoice. In Latin you can't rejoice something directly (I'm not sure you really can in English) but you can rejoice in it. In reverentia can mean in respect, deference or restraint as well as in reverence. Gaudere in reverentia does seem contradictory, but to rejoice in restraint is also oxymoronical in English.
ah, I understand now. Thank you for the clarification.
 
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