“The truth will set you free. But not until it is finished with you.”

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Hi, could you provide some context? What do you mean by "not until it is finished with you"?
 

fletch

New Member
Hi, could you provide some context? What do you mean by "not until it is finished with you"?

Thank you for your response! It basically means (what I gather from it, anyway) that the truth will set you free once you are true to yourself and accept your own faults and shortcomings.
 

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
I really don't know how to go about 'is finished with', but there's facesso 'go away from (having finished one's business)'.

Veritas te liberabit, dum modo rem tuam facessat.

The truth will set you free, provided it is done with your affairs.

:no-clue:
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
facessat.
That verb would need to be in the perfect to convey an idea like "be done with".

I'm not sure about using that verb at all, though. I think perfecerit would be better but even then, maybe the translation would still not be the best.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
veritas, mihi crede, liberabit
te; sed non nisi te stuprarit ante!
 

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
Pacifica dixit:
That verb would need to be in the perfect to convey an idea like "be done with".
Mmm. I thought the perfectivity might be implicit in the transferred meaning of 'depart from', which, granted, is listed as intransitive. But then, the only reason this word came to mind was because of the Menaechmi, where dictum facessas is translated by the dictionary as 'be done with'.
 

syntaxianus

Civis Illustris
...not before it has finished with you (about yourself).

...non ante quam tecum confecerit (de te).

L&S: s.v. conficio: a. In the lang. of business, to settle, close a bargain, finish, etc.; absol. : tu cum Apella Chio confice de columnis, Cic. Att. 12, 19, 1
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
...not before it has finished with you (about yourself).

...non ante quam tecum confecerit (de te).

L&S: s.v. conficio: a. In the lang. of business, to settle, close a bargain, finish, etc.; absol. : tu cum Apella Chio confice de columnis, Cic. Att. 12, 19, 1

... not until it has made a deal with you about yourself?! oO
 

syntaxianus

Civis Illustris
I thought of cōnficiō too, but that would have to be with accusative, "tēcum cōnficere" is "with you as company" ... "dē tē" wouldn't work either.


let's say then ...nōn priusquam tē cōnfēcerit
That sounds like "not before it has killed you." Or "finished you off."
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
It means "not before it has closed a bargain/deal with you concerning yourself."
 

Godmy

A Monkey
Not so much that but "not before it has settled with you / come to terms with you in matters concerning yourself."
But the verb needs an object, it's transitive... this is just an incredible extrapolation from the English sentence, Syntax... I mean, one needs to check first how Romans used the verb, L&S always gives you the examples of use and you use L&S so... just spend more time with the examples, that's all.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
But the verb needs an object, it's transitive... this is just an incredible extrapolation from the English sentence, Syntax... I mean, one needs to check first how Romans used the verb, L&S always gives you the examples of use and you use L&S so... just spend more time with the examples, that's all.
Well, Syntaxianus did post an L&S citation where there is no stated object:
L&S: s.v. conficio: a. In the lang. of business, to settle, close a bargain, finish, etc.; absol. : tu cum Apella Chio confice de columnis, Cic. Att. 12, 19, 1
But, like Bitmap, I'm not sure this use fits the meaning intended by the OP.
 

Godmy

A Monkey
Well, Syntaxianus did post an L&S citation where there is no stated object:
Right, I noticed later, I have just posted about it^ , I just wouldn't believe somebody would chose this submeaning. I must confess I often spend little time reading individual posts when I notice something in the post that makes no sense to me. (something in bold, let's say)
 
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