“You’re wrong, and here’s why.”

BreakerOfHorses

New Member
Hello.

My name is John, from South Jersey, USA. I was looking for help translating a phrase properly (as opposed to dog Latin / machine translations). I also thought this forum might be useful as my daughter is taking Latin next Fall and I want to re-learn (I have not had a class in Latin since 1984).

In any case, I will not waste your valuable time. I’m looking for a translation of the phrase “You’re wrong, and here’s why.” It is an inside family joke that I would like to have translated properly so we can make up t-shirts for a family reunion. In keeping with the posting rules I will NOT post the Google translation I found.

Thank you for your consideration and sharing your expertise.

John
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Hi,

I'd say: Tu falsus/falsa* es, et ecce rationem: (Literally) You're wrong, and here's the reason:

*Use falsus if addressing a male, falsa if addressing a female. If you want to address multiple people, the first part would be Tu Vos falsi estis.
 

BreakerOfHorses

New Member
Wow! That was fast!

Thank you!

Should I sit back and wait to see if others contribute? It mentioned something about waiting for a discussion to ensue in the "READ THIS FIRST" post.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Should I sit back and wait to see if others contribute? It mentioned something about waiting for a discussion to ensue in the "READ THIS FIRST" post.
Absolutely wait for confirmations or revisions. Sometimes the simplest phrases wind up becoming incredibly convoluted...

You mean (vos) falsi estis.
See? ;) Stupid typo...
 

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
falsus es

te fallit or falleris

falsus es = you are a wrong one, you are a liar, you are a fake one
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
I think was confirming before ſeeing L.C.F.'s ſuggestion, but now I am too confused to confirm anything.:confused:

You should really stop doing that. It is never clear what and most importantly why are you confirming something.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
You should really stop doing that. It is never clear what and most importantly why are you confirming something.
This was answered in the sub rosa thread you made a while back. Confirming is just a means of (re)assuring the OP that a proposed translation is correct.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
I don't see why falsus, past participle of falli, isn't as equally correct as falleris.


If you were speaking in the past narrative tense, then yes. But there is no need to do that here, and the verb does not have a perfect present feel to be used as such.
Plus, the adjective falsus, a, um = fake, is too strong.

A latin way to express this is in the present tense. With 3d impers: te fallit,
or a passive impers. falleris. Remember this phrase for the next time: "ni fallor".
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
I suppose that makes sense, and yes, I've written ni(si) fallor before, but never ni falsus... Falleris seems to make much more sense than falsus es in retrospect.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
I think the most recently "proposed" translation is: Tu falleris, et ecce rationem, but there might be more to discuss.
 
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