Accept everything. Expect anything. Regret nothing.

Ace Powell

New Member
This is my personal motto and I would like to see what it would sound in Latin. Then I will probably create merchandise with it or engrave it on a plaque to be hanged in my office.

Your help is much appreciated, thank you!
 

Lysandra

Canis
I’m not totally sure about the last part so wait for someone else to answer.

Accipe omnia. Exspecta quidquam. Noli paenitere quidquam.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
I think in this case paenite nihil would be better.
"paenitet" is an impersonal verb. It is very rare (and not classical) for it to be used personally like you did. (i.e. for "I'm sorry", you don't say "paeniteo", but "me paenitet".)
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
No, because the imperative "paenite" is still a second person form. In classical Latin "paenitet" only occurs in third person forms. Imperfacundus's "ne quid te paeniteat" works.
 

Mafalda

Civis Illustris
But it would be better to maintain the same rhythm, you know: (Verb in the imperative + direct object) x 3 and six words in all. Otherwise it does not look nice.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Unfortunately, you can't just ignore grammar to make something look nice. There are very few examples of paenitet used personally (L+S dictionary cites two from Livy, one of which could be interpreted as still impersonal, one from Sallust, who goes out of his way to do everything weirdly, and two instances of paenitens in Suetonius. The rest are not classical Latin examples).

On a slightly related note, the original English sentence sounds very good with the repetition of —thing. That repetition would not be preserved in Latin. Therefore I think that no matter what translation we come up with, the English will still sound better.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
I discovered that there's an instance of "paenitemini" in the Vulgate for "repent!", so on the analogy of that we could probably say something like "paenitere nihil", if we don't care about being perfectly classical. "paeniteatur nihil" does not seem to make much sense.

paenitemini et credite Evangelio,repent Vulg. Marc. 1, 15
 
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