Accurrite amores disponite honores reginæ tonantis.

Arnica

Member
This is from the text of a 17th-century Marian motet. Could there be a parallelism between "Accurrite amores" and "disponite honores", in other words with both nouns in same case? Or is the first a vocative, and the second an accusative? And how should one understand the word "amores" in a religious context?

Any suggestions for an English translation would be appreciated.

Many thanks.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
This appears to be the verse, although I am not sure what unareorum is:

O sponsa tonantis, Regina Coelorum,
Spes unareorum, solamen clamantis.
Haec spes suspirantis accurite amores
Disponite honores Reginae tonantis.
 

Arnica

Member
May I ask where this is from? The motet I'm working on seems to be the only known setting of this text.In the source, there is practically no punctuation.

"unareorum" is clearly two words in the source and should read "una reorum".

Thanks.
 

Arnica

Member
This edition is unfortunately very inaccurate. There are numerous mistakes both in the text and the music, and then further mistakes in the text given on the site. Starting with the very first words: "coelentur " should read "collætantur", for instance.

The original source is available here:

http://www.bibliotecamusica.it/cmbm/images/ripro/gaspari/AA/AA176/AA176_004.jpg
http://www.bibliotecamusica.it/cmbm/images/ripro/gaspari/AA/AA176/AA176_005.jpg
http://www.bibliotecamusica.it/cmbm/images/ripro/gaspari/AA/AA176/AA176_042.jpg
http://www.bibliotecamusica.it/cmbm/images/ripro/gaspari/AA/AA176/AA176_043.jpg

Thanks.

PS. The passage in question appears on the third of these four links.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
All the links lead to the same page
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Not sure about the exact separation of the lines, but:

Hodie exultat Plebs Fidelium
Hodie gemunt Tartara
dum triplici diademate mater
et Regina coronata triumphat coronata triumphat
triumphat mater et Regina coronata triumphat
Hec spes suspirantis accurrite amores
dispnonite honores Regine tonantis
disponite honores regine tonantis
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
I must confess it has me stumped!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Est is implied, and I think some punctuation would help:

Haec spes suspirantis (est); accurrite amores

The first bit referring to Mary.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
amores seems like a strange word for a religious song. I can't find a single reference to it in the Vulgate. Sounds more like Ovid.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Pagan elements are sometimes Christianized. It isn't the only one in this piece: note tonantis, which used to be a name of Jove.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Yes that is also confusing. I can't think of any other references to Mary as the thunderer.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I guess the phrasing is ambiguous, but I was taking reginae to be dative and tonantis to be genitive, referring to God. Something like "Distribute honors to the queen of the Thunderer".
 

Arnica

Member
I guess the phrasing is ambiguous, but I was taking reginae to be dative and tonantis to be genitive, referring to God. Something like "Distribute honors to the queen of the Thunderer".
I agree. This is preceded by "O sponsa tonantis", where tonantis can only by a genitive.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
For a complete translation of the two lines you were asking about, I would say something like this:

She is the hope of the sighing man; come quickly, Loves; distribute honors to the queen of the Thunderer.
 

Arnica

Member
For a complete translation of the two lines you were asking about, I would say something like this:

She is the hope of the sighing man; come quickly, Loves; distribute honors to the queen of the Thunderer.
Many thanks for your help. Much appreciated.

One last comment on these two lines: in both settings mentioned, there is a musical parallel between accurrite amores and disponite honores. Which is why I thought there might be a grammatical parallel also. And wondered if honores couldn't be a vocative rather than an accusative. Of course, disponite would have to have a "passive" meaning, which I don't seem to find in my dictionaries.

Any thoughts?
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
disponere is transitive, so if you take honores as a vocative, it would be missing a direct object.
 
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