Ad captandum muscas..

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

No semantic difference, only a matter of style or aesthetics, I guess. Also, the latter form, a gerundive, is found more often imo than a simple gerund.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Very theoretically, but in practice classical authors never used a gerund with direct object after a preposition.
 

Puer Pedens

Member

Discimus docendo, ok!

Discimus Linguam Latinam docendo, ok!

But, Discimus Lingua Latina docenda? is this correct, too?! if so, what's the logic behind it?

As usual, thanks in advance.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

But, Discimus Lingua Latina docenda? is this correct, too?!
Yes.
if so, what's the logic behind it?
I think nobody is quite sure of the logic behind that use of gerundives. As I wrote elsewhere:
It is debatable how much of what appears should be the literal meaning of a phrase such as ad delectandos amicos, namely "towards friends needing to be amused", was still actually felt in a Roman's mind, or not; but for all practical purposes, it means the same as ad delectandum amicos, and translates exactly the same way: "(in order) to amuse friends".
 
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