Aeneid - Book XI

AoM

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Ah, the first book of the Aeneid that I read in Latin. Though it was probably about 6 years ago at this point. And ah, when I would write all over the text/margins. :surprised:



It'll be interesting to read through it now, and have much better context for the things that are going on! lol
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
That's a strange book to start with.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Indeed. A more logical book to start with is book 1.
 

AoM

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Heh, was a college class, so didn't have any say there. I hadn't read any Virgil up to that point, so thought I might as well jump in there. And it definitely helped that the professor was one of the favorites in the department.
 

AoM

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contra ego vivendo vici mea fata, superstes
restarem ut genitor. Troum socia arma secutum
obruerent Rutuli telis! animam ipse dedissem
atque haec pompa domum me, non Pallanta, referret! (160-3)

:bawling2:

 
Ah, the first book of the Aeneid that I read in Latin. Though it was probably about 6 years ago at this point. And ah, when I would write all over the text/margins. :surprised:



It'll be interesting to read through it now, and have much better context for the things that are going on! lol

My first experience with Vergil was in college, and we started in Book 7. Why? The professor said that too many people ignored Books 7-12, so that's where he wanted to start. However, I was hooked immediately -- I remember thinking how beautiful the initial lines were, and realizing why this had been popular for millenia.
 

AoM

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My first experience with Vergil was in college, and we started in Book 7. Why? The professor said that too many people ignored Books 7-12, so that's where he wanted to start. However, I was hooked immediately -- I remember thinking how beautiful the initial lines were, and realizing why this had been popular for millenia.
Yup, my professor gave the same reason.
 

AoM

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That echo of book 2. Another city in grief.

iam vero in tectis, praedivitis urbe Latini,
praecipuus fragor et longi pars maxima luctus. (213-4)

ergo omnis longo soluit se Teucria luctu (2.26)
 

AoM

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But is that really a deliberate echo?
Heh. Can never really know for sure, I guess. Though it is the only two times he uses the phrase.

And take another one with luctus. Anchises addressing Aeneas:

o gnate, ingentem luctum ne quaere tuorum (6.868)

And the only other time, with Latinus in 11:

deficit ingenti luctu rex ipse Latinus (231)

And look who's mentioned in the very next line:

fatalem Aenean manifesto numine ferri

Latinus and his future gnatus (gener).
 

AoM

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I could've read like 200 lines of Drances and Turnus just going back and forth at each other. :argue-red:
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Drances came up in Nationals finals. I didn't do too well that round but I got that question.

The Toss-up was "To whom are the following lines from Vergil's Aeneid, spoken by Juno, addressed? non pugnam aspicere hanc oculis, non foedera possum. / tu pro germano si quid praesentius audes, / perge; decet. forsan miseros meliora sequentur."

The answer was Juturna (I got it around "germano").

Then the first bonus was to identify the speaker of some lines and the answer was Drances. I can't remember what B2 was.
 

AoM

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Poor Lavinia. The one time she's mentioned by name in the book, she's immediately deemed causa mali tanti lol.
 

AoM

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"Dad, I don't think this is going to work."

 

AoM

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That's a lot of backs/behinds. The simile and the Turnus|free horse one earlier are two of my favorites.

Extemplo turbatae acies, versique Latini
reiciunt parmas et equos ad moenia vertunt;
Troes agunt, princeps turmas inducit Asilas.
iamque propinquabant portis rursusque Latini
clamorem tollunt et mollia colla reflectunt;
hi fugiunt penitusque datis referuntur habenis.
qualis ubi alterno procurrens gurgite pontus
nunc ruit ad terram scopulosque superiacit unda
spumeus extremamque sinu perfundit harenam,
nunc rapidus retro atque aestu revoluta resorbens
saxa fugit litusque vado labente relinquit:
bis Tusci Rutulos egere ad moenia versos,
bis reiecti armis respectant terga tegentes. (618-630)
 

AoM

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Very intentional (given all the people running away). ::D
 

AoM

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Haven't been checking Kline's translation that thoroughly, but looking at a couple of lines, I think he was starting to run on fumes a little at this point.
 
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