"After all"

TheMouseAvenger

New Member
Well, looks like I'm in need of further help with English-to-Latin translation!

After searching the Internet & these forums, I have not been able to find any Latin translation for the English adverbial phrase "after all". Can anyone help me out with this? :)
 

Arca Defectionis

Civis Illustris
Depends on what you mean. If you mean something like "after all we've been through," you might just say "post omnia." If you mean "after all" followed by some assertion ("in any case"), you might use "tamen," or in some cases "quippe" or "enim." If you mean "in the end" (as in "turns out they won't be coming after all"), then maybe "revera" or something like that.

By the way, have you seen the little mouse thread? It's just hilarious that your username is "TheMouseAvenger" :D
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
By the way, have you seen the little mouse thread? It's just hilarious that your username is "TheMouseAvenger" :D
Indeed! I thought exactly the same thing when I saw this username. That "little mouse" thread was memorable! :D
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ensis vindex te persequitur Iustitiae...
 

Kosmokrator

Active Member
hmm ... ceterum?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ceterum?
 

Kosmokrator

Active Member
yes ... but since i don't know english enough i'm unsure
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Well maybe. Anyway I don't think there's a Latin expression that's exactly the same as the English "after all"... But maybe that's similar.

Doesn't "after all" exist in Italian? In French it does. Après tout.

Or postremo?
 

Kosmokrator

Active Member
of course it does "dopotutto" ... i am unsure postremo can have the same meaning as "dopotutto" maybe some references would help.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Dic definition: postremo: 1) After everything else, last of all, lastly. b. (in a logical sequence) in the last place, finally. 2) On the last occasion, most recently, last, for the last time. 3) In the end, eventually, at last. b. in the last resort, finally. 4) To sum up, in short, in fact. b. after all, in the last resort.

...... don't know. In certain contexts maybe it can do.
 

Kosmokrator

Active Member
well i think after all has an avversative meaning like anyway or similars so i think postremo it's not good ... anyway there's no latin to english full correspondence or to any modern language; you should think in latin to write in latin not in your native language. That's why you need to read a lot in latin to write in latin.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
well i think after all has an avversative meaning like anyway or similars
Right. So you think postremo doesn't have that meaning and ceterum does..?
you should think in latin to write in latin not in your native language. That's why you need to read a lot in latin to write in latin.
I'll do my best.
 

malleolus

Civis Illustris
Probably denique , even tandem .
 

Kosmokrator

Active Member
Denique most likely
 

TheMouseAvenger

New Member
Depends on what you mean. If you mean something like "after all we've been through," you might just say "post omnia." If you mean "after all" followed by some assertion ("in any case"), you might use "tamen," or in some cases "quippe" or "enim." If you mean "in the end" (as in "turns out they won't be coming after all"), then maybe "revera" or something like that.

By the way, have you seen the little mouse thread? It's just hilarious that your username is "TheMouseAvenger" :D
Thanks very much for your help! ^_^ I really do appreciate it! :D

Oh, & I haven't seen that thread yet. I'll have to check it out! :)
 

Manus Correctrix

QVAE CORRIGIT
Apart from its more literal meanings, the idiomatic expression ‘after all’ is used to introduce a phrase that contradicts something or at least is aimed at persuading. It presents this information as not particularly new or surprising.

So, something like quippe, enim, autem, etc., or some combination, could convey the sense.

Unless you give an example sentence, no real help can be given.

yes ... but since i don't know english enough i'm unsure
Why are you shouting?
 

Kosmokrator

Active Member
i must have used some combination of keys while typing
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
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