"Always one"

RobynsLee

New Member
I am seeking the translation from English to Latin to convey the phrase "always one", to use in a logo/emblem.

"Always one meaning that all things come from the same source and spirit. Oneness. That despite labels we are always one. To hopefully help with the description, what I DON'T want it to mean is "together we are stronger".

Hope my description can convey the right meaning for translating as it doesn't seem to be as simple as I originally thought. Thanks in advance for any help.
 
(Omnes) Semper Unum
'(All) [are] always one [thing].'
 
so just to confirm even though you can leave out (Omnes) the two words would be sufficiently correct to the meaning?
Yes, although I will say that it matches in its grammar the abstractness of the English. That is, were a Roman to read it, he would probably be puzzled.
 

rothbard

Aedilis
Staff member
That’s interesting- thanks for posting the link. I’m not understanding your suggestion though..
I think Agrippa's sounds like a closer translation of what you want to say, i.e. that all things come from the same source and spirit.
 

RobynsLee

New Member
Thanks for your input for that. I’m getting what you mean and I think in that sense it does feel more connected to the message.
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Question- would “universus” also be a contender?
You mean "universum", I suppose. My answer: yes.
Cf. Meister Eckhart, medieval German philosopher, in his Expositio libri Genesis cap. 1 § 12
(https://www.google.de/books/edition/Meister_Eckhart_Studienausgabe_der_Latei/Z_N3DwAAQBAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=Sed+hoc+unum+est+ipsum+totum+universum,+quod+a+deo+procedit,+unum+quidem+in+multis+partibus+universi,+sicut+deus+ipse+producens+est+unus+sive+unum+simplex+...&pg=PA38&printsec=frontcover):
Sed hoc unum est ipsum totum universum, quod a deo procedit, unum quidem in multis partibus universi
 
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