Andria 172 - 183

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Simo Davos
SI. Non dubiumst quin uxorem nolit filius;
ita Davom modo timere sensi, ubi nuptias
futuras esse audivit. sed ipse exit foras.
DA. mirabar hoc si sic abiret et eri semper lenitas 175
verebar quorsum evaderet.
qui postquam audierat non datum iri filio uxorem suo,
numquam quoiquam nostrum verbum fecit neque id aegre tulit.
SI. at nunc faciet neque, ut opinor, sine tuo magno malo.
DA. id voluit nos sic necopinantis duci falso gaudio, 180
sperantis iam amoto metu, interoscitantis opprimi,
ne esset spatium cogitandi ad disturbandas nuptias:
astute. SI. carnufex quae loquitur? DA. erus est neque provideram.

Simo - Davos
SI. There's no doubt that the son doesn't want to marry; I felt at once that Davos was fearing so, when he heard there was going to be a marriage. But he went out himself.
DA. I would have been surprised if this had been allowed to pass like that, and I was always afraid of how far would the master's clemency go. After he'd heard that the wife would not be given to his son, never did he speak a word to any of us nor did he take it ill.
SI. But now he will and, in my opinion, not without causing you great trouble.
DA. He wanted us, as we were thus unsuspecting, to be influenced by a false joy, while we had good hope as fear was removed, to be caught unaware while nodding, so that there would be no time to think about upsetting the marriage: clever.
SI. What's the villain talking about?
DA. He's the master and I hadn't expected that.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
* he never spoke a word , sounds better
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris
This section is very difficult.
See my interpretation below and do please let me know what ye think.

Line 172-4
Non dubiumst quin uxorem nolit filius;
ita Davom modo timere sensi, ubi nuptias
futuras esse audivit. sed ipse exit foras.


There’s no doubt MY son doesn’t want to marry [it’s still Simo speaking (to himself)]
Thus I sensed that Davos was anxious as soon as he heard there was going to be a wedding. But here he comes [out of the house. i.e. Simo is announcing to the audience that this is Davos arriving on stage, and hiding himself]

175-178
mirabar hoc si sic abiret et eri semper lenitas
verebar quorsum evaderet.
qui postquam audierat non datum iri filio uxorem suo,
numquam quoiquam nostrum verbum fecit neque id aegre tulit.

[Davos doesn’t see Simo] I was surprised that it turned out like this [i.e. that the wedding got called off and that Simo has stayed happy], and I was afraid of where the master’s mildness [i.e. good humour] was leading [i.e his good humour made Davos suspect a trick]
Since after he learned that his son would not get a wife, he never mentioned a word of it to any of us nor did he take it at all badly.

179
at nunc faciet neque, ut opinor, sine tuo magno malo.
But now he will [i.e. I will take it badly], and I doubt whether it will go easy on you [i.e. now that I know you’ve spotted my plan, I am going to make your life a misery]

180-3
id voluit nos sic necopinantis duci falso gaudio,
sperantis iam amoto metu, interoscitantis opprimi,
ne esset spatium cogitandi ad disturbandas nuptias:
astute.

That’s what he wanted, that we thus unsuspecting, led [astray] by a false joy [our false joy that the wedding was completely off], full of confidence since all fear was removed, be caught unaware while nodding, so that there would be no time [when the wedding was re-announced] to think about upsetting the marriage: clever.


[i.e. the master should have been in a bad mood after the cancellation, but by pretending that he was fine with the cancellation, Pamphilus and Davos thought all danger of a wedding was gone, and so stopped plotting, when in fact Davos is now realising that Simo is still planning to get the wedding back on]
[The current state of mind expressed in these lines explains the imperfect of the verebar earlier on.]


[These are hard lines, and it took me a bit (a lot!) of thinking to figure out what was happening. Do please tell me if I am completely wrong (I could be, especially since I am discovering the play as I go along here), or indeed if this was obvious to everyone but me]


Line 183
erus est neque provideram.
It’s the master! And I never saw him. [i.e. he only sees him now – up to now he’s been talking to himself with Simo hidden and overhearing him]
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Line 172-4
Non dubiumst quin uxorem nolit filius;
ita Davom modo timere sensi, ubi nuptias
futuras esse audivit. sed ipse exit foras.

There’s no doubt MY son doesn’t want to marry [it’s still Simo speaking (to himself)]
Thus I sensed that Davos was anxious as soon as he heard there was going to be a wedding. But here he comes [out of the house. i.e. Simo is announcing to the audience that this is Davos arriving on stage, and hiding himself]
You're right.
175-178
mirabar hoc si sic abiret et eri semper lenitas
verebar quorsum evaderet.
qui postquam audierat non datum iri filio uxorem suo,
numquam quoiquam nostrum verbum fecit neque id aegre tulit.
[Davos doesn’t see Simo] I was surprised that it turned out like this [i.e. that the wedding got called off and that Simo has stayed happy]
Abiret is subj., and we have si (it can't be "that it turned out like this", it would be an acc.-inf. or a quod clause; si intoduces a conditional clause) so it's as I said "I would have been surprised if it had been allowed to pass like that". More literally "I was surprised if it would be allowed..." but that's not something you'd say in English.
and I was afraid of where the master’s mildness [i.e. good humour] was leading [i.e his good humour made Davos suspect a trick]
That's what I understood. But you formulated it better.
Since after he learned that his son would not get a wife, he never mentioned a word of it to any of us nor did he take it at all badly.
That's the same meaning as what I wrote, maybe better reformulated. Except that there's no "at all" in the Latin.
[These are hard lines, and it took me a bit (a lot!) of thinking to figure out what was happening. Do please tell me if I am completely wrong (I could be, especially since I am discovering the play as I go along here), or indeed if this was obvious to everyone but me]
You seem to get it very well.
Line 183
erus est neque provideram.
It’s the master! And I never saw him. [i.e. he only sees him now – up to now he’s been talking to himself with Simo hidden and overhearing him]
I hadn't gotten that! Thanks!
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Thanks for your suggestions, limetrees.
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris
You're right.
Abiret is subj., and we have si (it can't be "that it turned out like this", it would be an acc.-inf. or a quod clause; si intoduces a conditional clause) so it's as I said "I would have been surprised if it had been allowed to pass like that". More literally "I was surprised if it would be allowed..." but that's not something you'd say in English.
Ah, yes, but I don't see why you have the "allowed". Is it because of the subjunctive?
Rather: "I would have been surprised if it had ended thus" [i.e. it was all a bit too easy, (and moreover the master's humour made me suspicious, and now I have figured out what was really happening)]

And yes, the "at all" in the "not taking it badly" was my addition, just for emphasis/idiom (trying to get into the character), but not needed.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
"To be allowed to pass" is just a definition my dic gives for abire, and it makes sense here. He would have been surprised if it had been allowed to pass like that, i.e. if his master had let things go that way without attempting something.
 
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