Andria 195 - 205

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Hello all!

SI. nempe ergo aperte vis quae restant me loqui? DA. sane quidem. 195
SI. si sensero hodie quicquam in his te nuptiis
fallaciae conari quo fiant minus,
aut velle in <ea> re ostendi quam sis callidus,
verberibu' caesum te in pistrinum, Dave, dedam usque ad necem,
ea lege atque omine ut, si te inde exemerim, ego pro te molam. 200
quid, hoc intellexti[n]? an nondum etiam ne hoc quidem? DA. immo callide:
ita aperte ipsam rem modo locutu's, nil circum itione usus es.
SI. ubivis faciliu' passu' sim quam in hac re me deludier.
DA. bona verba, quaeso! SI. inrides? nil me falli'. sed dico tibi:
ne temere facias; neque tu haud dicas tibi non praedictum: cave! 205

SI. So I suppose you want me to say the rest clearly?
DA. Yes, certainly.
SI. If I see you today at this marriage attempt any trick to prevent it from taking place, or try in that matter to show how crafty you are, I will whip you and hand you over to the pounding mill to be tortured to death, Davos, on these terms and under this threat that, if I took you out of there, I would grind the mill for you. So, have you understood this? Or not even this yet?
DA. No, I understand very well: like this you've clearly told the point itself only, you have used no circumlocution.
SI. I would tolerate to be deceived in any circumstance more easily than in this matter.
DA. Good words, say!
SI. You're laughing at me? Nothing escapes me. But I tell you: do nothing imprudent, and don't you say that I haven't warned you: beware!
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
So everything seems OK in this passage, sodales ?
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris
The few tricky parts and what I think is happening

196-97
hodie quicquam in his te nuptiis
fallaciae conari quo fiant minus
if I find out today that you are trying any tricks about this marriage, to stop it taking place.
[your version makes it that the marriage ceremony is happening today and Davos is there plotting, and I think the “in his nuptiis” is “concerning the marriage”]

199
usque ad necem
until you die [the “nex” torture being the grinding at the mill]

200
ea lege atque omine ut
with this solemn condition, that if I ever took you out of there, I would grind at the mill in your place
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
196-97
hodie quicquam in his te nuptiis
fallaciae conari quo fiant minus
if I find out today that you are trying any tricks about this marriage, to stop it taking place.
[your version makes it that the marriage ceremony is happening today and Davos is there plotting, and I think the “in his nuptiis” is “concerning the marriage”]
The marriage is actually supposed to take place the same day (that's what he pretends)... only later the same day, so you're nonetheless right. ;) The idea is not so much that he tells him not to perturb the marriage while it would be taking place, as that he tells him not to try anything before to prevent it from taking place. So it's better translated with "about this marriage" than literally "in" as I did.
199
usque ad necem
until you die [the “nex” torture being the grinding at the mill]
I first wrote "until death" but "I'll hand you over to the pounding mill until death" sounded weird, then it's Matthaeus who proposed "to be tortured to death". I actually thought that pistrinium was here a place where slaves were punished by torture rather than an actual mill (and it seems like Matthaeus thought the same...) but I see it's a real mill.
200
ea lege atque omine ut
with this solemn condition, that if I ever took you out of there, I would grind at the mill in your place
Not so much different from what I wrote. You just fused ea lege atque omine/"on these terms and under this threat" into one "with this solemn condition" to make it more idiomatic English.

Thanks for the advice!
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris
I first wrote "until death" but "I'll hand you over to the pounding mill until death" sounded weird, then it's Matthaeus who proposed "to be tortured to death". I actually thought that pistrinium was here a place where slaves were punished by torture rather than an actual mill (and it seems like Matthaeus thought the same...) but I see it's a real mill.

I knew about the pistrinium because in an earlier passage, LCF actually spoke about it as the punishment which Simo would putatively impose on Davos ("si eum sensero ..." if I remember correctly). I don't know if LCF knew the play already or is just so thoroughly Romanised that he can enter into the character that well.
 
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