Annals 11.10 - 'et hinc contra itum ad amnem Erinden'

Phoebus Apollo

Civis Illustris
Exim validissimas praefecturas invisit; et reciperare Armeniam avebat, ni a Vibio Marso, Syriae legato, bellum minitante cohibitus foret. atque interim Gotarzes paenitentia concessi regni et vocante nobilitate, cui in pace durius servitium est, contrahit copias. et hinc contra itum ad amnem Erinden; in cuius transgressu multum certato pervicit Vardanes, prosperisque proeliis medias nationes subegit ad flumen Sinden, quod Dahas Ariosque disterminat.

Struggling a bit with the intricacies of this sentence.

It seems to me as if there is a missing 'impetus erat' ('there was an attack against his departure') or something to that effect after hinc?

Not entirely sure whether to translate 'hinc' as 'then' or 'here'?

(Also, I'm aware that huic is printed elsewhere, but the OCT, which I must use, has 'hinc'.)
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I don't think you need to add anything to the sentence other than 'est' to make it grammatical.
itum est ad amnem Erinden = 'It was walked to the river Erindis' = 'a march (of troops) was set in motion towards the river Erindis'

You would justify huic contra as 'against him (Gotarzes)' ... you would usually expect that to be hunc contra, but maybe contra can just be taken as an adverb and huic as some kind of dative of reference.
hinc would mean 'from here'/'from this place'. Contextually, it doesn't seem to make sense to take it as an adverb of place, so my take would be take it as an adverb of time: 'from this point of time on'... or more simply 'then', 'from then on'. In that case you would take contra to mean 'on the other side' (i.e. by his adversaries).
 

Phoebus Apollo

Civis Illustris
I don't think you need to add anything to the sentence other than 'est' to make it grammatical.
itum est ad amnem Erinden = 'It was walked to the river Erindis' = 'a march (of troops) was set in motion towards the river Erindis'

You would justify huic contra as 'against him (Gotarzes)' ... you would usually expect that to be hunc contra, but maybe contra can just be taken as an adverb and huic as some kind of dative of reference.
hinc would mean 'from here'/'from this place'. Contextually, it doesn't seem to make sense to take it as an adverb of place, so my take would be take it as an adverb of time: 'from this point of time on'... or more simply 'then', 'from then on'. In that case you would take contra to mean 'on the other side' (i.e. by his adversaries).
Thank you so much!
 
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