Another Libera Song

Steve Walker

New Member
I have another Libera Boys Choir song translation request. I hope someone here has time to help me out with the Latin portions of the lyrics posted below.

Thanks in advance!

Ave Verum

Ave verum corpus natum
De Maria virgine
Attende Domini et miserere
Quia peccavimus tibi
Attendite et miserere Domine
Attende Domini et miserere
Quia peccavimus tibi
Attendite et miserere Domine
A silent mystery
A silent mystery
The break of day
The break of day
A moment shines across eternity
Shines across eternity
Attende Domini et miserere
Quia peccavimus tibi
Attendite et miserere Domine
Ave verum corpus natum
De Maria virgine
Attende Domini et miserere
Quia peccavimus tibi
Attendite et miserere Domine
A silent harmony
A silent harmony
The sound…

It's a beautiful song if you want to Google it and listen. Highly recommended.

Music by the group's director Robert Prizeman, words by Prizeman and producer Ian Tilley.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
There are some mistakes in the Latin, but here's what I assume was the intended meaning, with the most likely corrections in parentheses:

Ave verum corpus natum
De Maria virgine


Hail, true body born of the Virgin Mary

Attende Domini (Domine) et miserere

Hearken, Lord, and have mercy

Quia peccavimus tibi

Because we have sinned against you

Attendite (attende) et miserere Domine

Hearken and have mercy, Lord

Attendite
is the plural imperative. It's just about possible that the author did mean to tell a group of people to "hearken" and then change addressee and tell the Lord to "have mercy", but it doesn't seem particularly likely.
 

Steve Walker

New Member
There are some mistakes in the Latin, but here's what I assume was the intended meaning, with the most likely corrections in parentheses:

Ave verum corpus natum
De Maria virgine


Hail, true body born of the Virgin Mary

Attende Domini (Domine) et miserere

Hearken, Lord, and have mercy

Quia peccavimus tibi

Because we have sinned against you

Attendite (attende) et miserere Domine

Hearken and have mercy, Lord

Attendite is the plural imperative. It's just about possible that the author did mean to tell a group of people to "hearken" and then change addressee and tell the Lord to "have mercy", but it doesn't seem particularly likely.
On listening to the song again after seeing your translation I believe the "Domini" is a typo and I believe the "attendite" simply fit better with the melody. Did you by any chance listen to the song?
 
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