Appearance of two As in Classical Latin

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
What do you mean by "two As"? There are many words containing two As, but maybe you mean something more specific, like two As right next to each other? Or are you talking about phonetics, as in Latin having two sorts of As with a slightly different sound?
 

Edmundus

New Member
What do you mean by "two As"? There are many words containing two As, but maybe you mean something more specific, like two As right next to each other? Or are you talking about phonetics, as in Latin having two sorts of As with a slightly different sound?
I mean two As beside each other/right next to each other.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I don't know if this counts as classical Latin, but there are Roman inscriptions where long vowels, including long As, are indicated by being written double — so a long A would be AA. Now, as for words that actually have two separate As next to each other, none immediately come to mind.
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Lewis and Short (via Perseus) have several common names
also quaad, collat. form of quoad,
and dĭăartymătōn, a kind of salve.
 

Hemo Rusticus

Lounge Lizard
Yeah, there's the attested MAARCVS, but it just stands for a later MARCVS pronounced as Mārcus, clearly an attempt for a more phonetic transcription in the earlier case.
How curious that you would know that... ;)
 

Ybytyruna

New Member
[LAT]
Ita! Priſci quoque Itali, ut puta, Oſce loquentes, vocalium longitudinem indicabant per duplices litteras:

fluusaí - flōra < *flōsa
aasas - āra < *āsa
fíísnú - fānum < *fāsnom
Viínikiís - Vīnicius < *wīno-
trístaamentud - testāmentō - < Lat. *tristāmentom < *tri-sto-
Staatiis - Stātius < *?

[ENG]
Ancient Italians as well, e.g. Oscan language speakers, indicated long vowels by duplicating them.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
[LAT]
Ita! Priſci quoque Itali, ut puta, Oſce loquentes, vocalium longitudinem indicabant per duplices litteras:

fluusaí - flōra < *flōsa
aasas - āra < *āsa
fíísnú - fānum < *fāsnom
Viínikiís - Vīnicius < *wīno-
trístaamentud - testāmentō - < Lat. *tristāmentom < *tri-sto-
Staatiis - Stātius < *?

[ENG]
Ancient Italians as well, e.g. Oscan language speakers, indicated long vowels by duplicating them.
I think Faliscans also, but I'd have to look around.
 

Serenus

legātus armisonus
I think Faliscans also, but I'd have to look around.
Apparently not. De Vaan's word index at the end of his etymological dictionary lists Faliscan mate (Latin māter, Oscan genitive maatreís), karai (Latin dative cārae), cubat (Old Latin -āt: *cubāt).
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I probably got it confused with another.
 
Top