As long as i breathe, i fight/struggle

snabbalg

New Member
Hey guys,

so... 'Dum spiro, spero' means As long as i breathe, i hope. Right?

So my question is what would As long as i breathe, i fight/struggle be?
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
dum spiro, pugno

That's a possibility. "While I breathe, I fight." Specifically fight physically, not really abstract "resistance."
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Another way of saying what QMF suggested would be:

Dum spiro, dimico

or

Dum spiro, certo ... maybe this is a more abstract way to express it while my suggestion above and QMF's sentence are rather physical.

You could also try

Dum spiro, studeo

"As long as I breathe, I strive" ... be careful though, man errs as long as he doth strive :)
 

snabbalg

New Member
heh :)

Thanks for that pointer bitmap, but there really isn't an option, is there?

Think im gonna go with Dum spiro, certo.

It has a nice ring to it.

Thanks for the help bitmap and QMF! Feel free to add more suggestions!
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
Certo...I like that one. Pugno did seem overly physical for this context, but was the first thing that came to mind.
 

Fulgor Laculus

Civis Illustris
The subtle difference between the two phrases should be noted:

In 'dum spiro, spero', the implication is that of a natural result - while I breathe, I hope (i.e. hope resulting from the fact that one still breathes). This is clear from the fact that the indicative is used.

On the other hand, 'dum spiro, certo' is a much stronger proviso phrase emphasizing the condition necessary for carrying out one's resolution - as long as I can breath, I will fight (i.e. my resolution to fight shall continue as long as I breath). Perhaps the subjunctive would do better here: dum spirem, certem.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I'm not quite sure whether the subjunctive is a preferable option here, Fulgor. It would turn the phrase into a dummodo-like construction like Oderint dum metuant (Let them hate, so long as they fear) ... which seems to put some more emphasis on the dum-clause. I'd understand that sentence to be "Let me fight, so long as I breathe", but with the meaning "...,what is important is that I breathe" in mind.

... but apart from that ...

Fulgor dixit:
as long as I can breath, I will fight (i.e. my resolution to fight shall continue as long as I breath).
... I can see your point, but I actually thought this was exactly what snabbalg wanted to express. After all, in his original English phrase, breathing is the necessary condition for struggling as well, isn't it?
 

Fulgor Laculus

Civis Illustris
Perhaps I didn't elucidate my point well enough. I meant to point out that I understand the phrase dum spiro, certo to plainly mean 'while I breathe, I fight' - two simple, unconditional, contemporaneous actions. This is the standard usage of dum with the indicative. If this is what the OP meant, then the phrase is just fine.
But I think that the OP's intention was to say something more like 'as long as I can breathe, I will fight' - a conditional sentence, where the outcome is dependent upon fulfillment of the condition. In this case, we need an indicative main clause along with a subjunctive proviso clause (strike my suggestion in my previous post - the future would do better here): Dum spirem, certabo. Although this might dismay the OP since the mimicry of the original quote is somewhat weaker.
 

snabbalg

New Member
Cheers for that Fulgor, now i have a few options to consider!
And even if Dum spirem, certabo would be the most appropriate way to say it, Dum spiro, certo still sounds better i think. Well, we'll see which one it'll be!

Thanks again guys!!
 

Ursula17

New Member
On the heels of that, what would the translation be for [Dum spiro, certo] "...and I am worth the fight." ?
The connotation I am looking for would be along the lines of "I am worth fighting for." or "I am worthy of the fight."
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I'm not sure certo was the best choice, actually.

"As long as I breathe, I fight; and I am worth the fight" I would say: dum spiro, pugno; et pugna digna sum.

If said by a female. If it were for a male, you'd need dignus instead of digna.
 
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