aut vincere aut mori

Djayazinho

New Member
Hello everyone. I've been wanting to get 6 sentences tattooed in the Latin language. Why Latin? Because I believe the Latin language is like ''above'' other languages. It has a touch of mystery to it and I simply love the spelling. It looks amazing. However, while doing my research on what sentences exactly I'd like I have come across A LOT of sentences that besides look cool also have a meaning to them that is relevant to me. I was wondering if anyone here would like to help me out with my tattoo because one of the sentences I really like is ''aut vincere aut mori'' but I've seen that sentence a lot on the internet so it's not really unique (this is how I feel) so perhaps someone could besides determine the right translation maybe provide another idiom/phrase that carries the same meaning but in different words.

If by any means I offended anyone by using this forum for this, my deepest apologies.











/
 

J.M

Active Member
Hello everyone. I've been wanting to get 6 sentences tattooed in the Latin language. Why Latin? Because I believe the Latin language is like ''above'' other languages. It has a touch of mystery to it and I simply love the spelling. It looks amazing. However, while doing my research on what sentences exactly I'd like I have come across A LOT of sentences that besides look cool also have a meaning to them that is relevant to me. I was wondering if anyone here would like to help me out with my tattoo because one of the sentences I really like is ''aut vincere aut mori'' but I've seen that sentence a lot on the internet so it's not really unique (this is how I feel) so perhaps someone could besides determine the right translation maybe provide another idiom/phrase that carries the same meaning but in different words.

If by any means I offended anyone by using this forum for this, my deepest apologies.
/
Greetings Djayazinho,

Here are some good Latin phrases:
1. Aut Viam Inveniam, Aut Faciam - I will either find a way or Make one
2. In Vino Veritas - In wine there is truth
3. Veritas Vos Liberabit - Truth will liberate you,

J.M
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
For number three, there's no need of using vos, unless you want to refer to more than one person.
 
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Bitmap

Civis Illustris
#3 is a quote from the Bible.
 
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Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Of course. I guess I figured that the tattooed person might interpret it differently.
 
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Djayazinho

New Member
First off, I greatly appreciate the responses!

I've changed the concept of the tattoo I want leaving me with approximately two sentences. The tattoo will be an animal such as a wolf, tiger or lion with a sliver of a scroll in its mouth. Because its the same piece of paper I want the two sentences to be relevant to each other and perhaps contain the animal in the sentence like if I'd put a wolf on my chest one sentence would be for example ''lupus non timet canem latrantem'' and the other could be like ''canis canem edit'' even though I'm not sure how that would correlate to each other.

Any animal with fangs that are named in Latin phrases would be welcome!

Edit: I especially like ''Veritas Liberit''. I will google myself nuts looking for an animal that has something to do with the truth like a crocodile (referring to the Egyptian Goddess Ammit: she would devour the heart when deemed not pure for example)
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I especially like ''Veritas Liberit''.
That's not a correct sentence, though. Did you mean to type Veritas Liberabit, which means "Truth will set (you) free" or Veritas Liberat, which would mean "Truth sets (you) free"?
 
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J.M

Active Member

Djayazinho

New Member
Is there any other way of saying ''canis canem edit'' (dog eats dog; it's a dog eat dog world)?
And I've searched for any phrases or proverbs that speak about tigers on this forum but have not found any so if someone has a latin phrase/proverb about tigers, please tell me!

Also: anguis in herba = a snake in the grass
How do you say in Latin ''beware of a snake in the grass''/''beware of the snakes in the grass''?
 
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Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Cave anguem in herba latentem!
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Pacifica added plural version alio loco ("Cave angues in herba latentes"). I don't understand what happened.
 
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Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Pacifica added plural version alio loco ("Cave angues in herba latentes"). I don't understand what happened.
The request was originally posted twice in 2 different threads. She might have tried to merge the threads and have missclicked somewhere.
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
What is the translation of the two? Thanks already!
Cave anguem in herba latentem
Cave angues in herba latentes
''beware of a snake in the grass''
and
''beware of the snakes in the grass''
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The request was originally posted twice in 2 different threads. She might have tried to merge the threads and have missclicked somewhere.
I didn't try to merge the threads. I merely went to the other thread and quoted Agrippa's translation there.
 
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