Baptism Titles

steelblue57

New Member
On a Catholic baptism record from the early 1800s, abbreviated titles Bapt. (for a man) and Laba. (for a woman) were used. What are the unabbreviated forms of these titles in Latin? What did the person do that had these titles? These were not the witnesses.

 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
I don't think there's really a difference between the two or, as you said, that a Sacrament's "name" is different for men and women, since the the Baptism is the same for both sexes. Is it possible that that is no title, but just a line followed by the date in which those people were baptized? And that the date is different so there's a chance those two people were baptized by two different priests?
In that case the abbreviations most likely mean:
Baptizma (variant baptisma)
Labacrum (variant of spelling lavacrum)
 
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steelblue57

New Member
The baptism record was only for one person. Under the name of the person being baptized are the 2 names that I had asked about. Those 2 names
are also shown for other baptism entries in the same record book so most likely they were performing the baptism.

In the same record book there is an entry that shows the title Baptisavi instead of the abbreviated Bapt. and for the Laba. it is different but difficult to read.

Another entry in the record book shows the title Curatus after the name with Bapt. in front of it.

Would Bapt. be the priest and the Laba. be the woman assisting the priest?
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
I need to think about this for a while before I can come to a better conclusion. As usual with this things the handwriting doesn't help much. Maybe someone else on the forum can give you better advice while I try to come up with a better idea.:)
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
What country is the register from?
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
Would Bapt. be the priest and the Laba. be the woman assisting the priest?
Even if the child is an orphan, the witness has to be a man that can be trusted. So that is most likely the child's mother, if that is a feminine name.

I just looked up for a Codex Iuris Canonici, the older I could find with a quick search is from the times of Pio X, and it says

De collati baptismi adnotatione et probatione:
Parochi debent nomina baptizatorum, mentione facta de ministro, parentibus ac patrinis, de loco ac die collati baptismi, in baptisimali libro sedulo et sine ulla mora referre.
Ubi vero de illegitimis filiis agatur, matris nomen est inserendum, si publice eius maternitatis constet, vel ipsa sponte sua scripto vel coram duobus testibus id petat; tem nomen patris, dummodo ipse sponte sia a parocho vel scripto vel coram duobus testibus id requirat, vel ex publico authentico documento sit notus; in ceteris casibus inscribatur natus tanquam filius patris ignoti vel ignotorum parentum.

Now, probably most of the infos (father, where?, when?...) are outside the cutout you posted (and in fact, we don't need that information per se), I think that is the name of the mother. If that is the case, the title could have to do with her job. I can't think of a feminine profession that starts with "laba", though :(

If my idea is correct, probably a considerable number of feminine names on the register have the same "title" (since back then there were few jobs a woman could do).

Edit, Edit, Edit: I've edited many times because I'm thinking. All three pictures have the name of the same woman, while the name of the priest changes. Unless we are talking of three brothers... I don't know. Exactly how many times the name of this woman appears on the register?
 
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EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
Well, the column of the mother is on the right, since it's "Mutter". While the column we were looking before is Namen des Kinders which means "Name of the children" if I can recall the little German I know. Now, I wonder why the name of the priest is written near the name of the child and who those women are, since they aren't the mother. I'll keep thinking and tonight I'll (hopefully) have some answer or I'll call myself out.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
I think that is the name of the midwife. It was an optional to write it on the register. I don't know how "midwife" is said in latin and how "laba." can fit in.
Sorry if I coudn't be of more help, but that's the only idea that comes to my mind.
 

Westcott

Civis Illustris
On the full page view, first entry, column 3, Baptizavi Damianus ... means I, Damian ..., baptised.
On later entries Bernard Hutter[?], curate, and Daniel Giz... have done the baptising.
 

Quintilianus

Civis Illustris
On the full page view, first entry, column 3, Baptizavi Damianus ... means I, Damian ..., baptised.
On later entries Bernard Hutter[?], curate, and Daniel Giz... have done the baptising.
The problem is what follows.
Do you know what the other row means, "Laba,"? I think it's the midwife
Hardly think so.
I'm not even sure it's "laba" or Latin for that matter.
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
Since the register is from the Czech Republic, I wonder if @Godmy could shed any light on this. I think this woman's name appears twice on those records, whatever her role was.
 

Quintilianus

Civis Illustris
Concentrating on the word itself may be a loss of time.
It'd probably be more efficient to find out why there would be in the first place someone else than the 'curatus' or 'cooperator' with their name underneath.
Asking Godmy if it's a Czech thing may not be a bad idea.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
A pedant writes: there was no Czech Republic in the 18th century. This is not me just being arsey, but relevant to the question of handwriting.
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
Why would he need help? The task is not onerous.
 
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