Can a sentence have more subjects?

Nojuzav

New Member
Salvēte

I'm getting myself confused with the idea and I've been pondering whether it's worth a thread. At last I've decided to get help.

I have this phrases from Pensum A Cap. V of Lingua Latina per se Illustrata by Hans Orberg.

"Dominus mult- serv- et mult- ancill- habet."

My gut feeling says to place Subject + ACC + Verb.
"Dominus multõs servõs et multās ancillās habet."

Implying that the subject (Dominus) have many servants and maids (directly owned, property?). However, is it possible for a sentence to have more than 1x subject.

"Dominus multī servī et multae ancillae habet"
Seems a bit odd as who's the verb for? Who has who? Am I wrong in that implication or is it something I will eventually learn?

Definitely a beginner here. Thanks
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
"Dominus multõs servõs et multās ancillās habet."
That's right.
However, is it possible for a sentence to have more than 1x subject.

"Dominus multī servī et multae ancillae habet"
Seems a bit odd as who's the verb for? Who has who? Am I wrong in that implication or is it something I will eventually learn?

Definitely a beginner here. Thanks
It is totally possible for a sentence to have more than one subject, or to have a composite subject as in "You and I love Latin", "Caesar, Cicero and Vergil are famous Latin writers" or "Rome and Carthage waged war on each other". However, in this case Dominus multī servī et multae ancillae habet doesn't make any sense. For one thing, the singular verb habet wouldn't agree with the plural subject. And even if you fixed that the sentence wouldn't be very meaningful.
 

Nojuzav

New Member
That's right.

It is totally possible for a sentence to have more than one subject, or to have a composite subject as in "You and I love Latin", "Caesar, Cicero and Vergil are famous Latin writers" or "Rome and Carthage waged war on each other". However, in this case Dominus multī servī et multae ancillae habet doesn't make any sense. For one thing, the singular verb habet wouldn't agree with the plural subject. And even if you fixed that the sentence wouldn't be very meaningful.
Could I follow the verb and use the verb to understand who's speaking to who? In the case above i did not notice the verb is in 3rd person singular which would of helped me to confirm that gut decision.

"Iūlius et Aemilia in vīllā habitant cum līberīs et servīs."

Would the above be composite subject since there is 2 subjects? The verb would only emphasizes the subject is plural "habitant". Who becomes composite, do both subjects in the above case be consider composite?

Which part of a sentence would you consider the most ideal for understanding, I know each word is inflected to give more meaning to the idea presented but could more attention to the verb describe more sense to the meaning of what is been said or is a verb useless without true representation from others words?

"Ea ab Aemiliā discēdit".
Ea (Iūlia), I feel I can comprehend the sentence as "something taking leave from something" without knowing what "ab + ablative" really means. Maybe these examples are to simple, and not real written latin.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Could I follow the verb and use the verb to understand who's speaking to who?
The verb, with its number- and person-specific ending, is one of many clues as to what can or cannot be the subject.
Would the above be composite subject since there is 2 subjects?
Yes.
Who becomes composite, do both subjects in the above case be consider composite?
You have a composite subject Iulius et Aemilia.
Which part of a sentence would you consider the most ideal for understanding, I know each word is inflected to give more meaning to the idea presented but could more attention to the verb describe more sense to the meaning of what is been said or is a verb useless without true representation from others words?
Every part of a sentence contributes to its meaning and is therefore important but if I have to choose which are most important I would say nouns and verbs, probably...
Maybe these examples are to simple, and not real written latin.
They are of course much simpler than most sentences you can find in "real" Latin, but that's only normal in a beginners' textbook.
 

Nojuzav

New Member
The verb, with its number- and person-specific ending, is one of many clues as to what can or cannot be the subject.

Yes.

You have a composite subject Iulius et Aemilia.

Every part of a sentence contributes to its meaning and is therefore important but if I have to choose which are most important I would say nouns and verbs, probably...

They are of course much simpler than most sentences you can find in "real" Latin, but that's only normal in a beginners' textbook.
Thank you, I see composite subjects now. I will continue to spot them, I have a feeling I came across a few sentences with composite already.

Yeah I guess the whole sentences will explain what is happening, the more words to detail the event the better the message can be understood unless its a bunch of filler words (not sure latin has that but I seen long English sentences that say nothing).

I will continue to spot for verbs and noun, everything around it is like seasoning on the steak, makes it much better to digest.

Thank you for your time.
 
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