Cantica in latinis

TheOtherDrew

New Member
Salvete omnes!

Ecce canticum "I love the mountains" in linguis latinis.

Montibus amo
Montibus amo.
Collis pulchra amo.
Flores amo.
Narcissus amo.
Ignis de focis amo,
cum crepusculum est.
*
Boom-dee-a-da
boom-dee-a-da
boom-dee-a-da
boom-dee-a.
*
Oceanus amo.
Mare tranquil amo.
Silvas amo.
apis bombus amo
Stellae in caelo amo,
cum nox ad mutat dies.
*
Lux de sol amo.
Papiliones amo.
Ventulus amo.
Fluit de flumin amo.
Lucem de urbis amo,
cum luna est altus.
*
Asteraceae amo.
Pisum sativum amo.
Campus amo.
Ventulus de aestas amo.
Ambulo amo,
caput meum in caelo
*



(Musa mea est femina qui cantat "Let it go" in latina in "youtube")


Lude mecum?

Canticum dilectus tuus scribis (totus aut una varsa tantum) in lingua latina.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Hi TheOtherDrew,

Do you wish to learn Latin?

If not, you may ignore my post.

If yes, I would suggest that you buy a textbook or something like that, and start at the beginning, with basic grammar.

Your translation is entirely wrong. One very important thing to know is that Latin words change forms according to their functions in a sentence, as well as depending on what or whom they refer to. So cobbling together random forms will never work. You need to learn which form corresponds to which function. This will be the first (though by no means the last) step toward adequate Latinity.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The entire thing, more or less,
Yeah, I guess "entirely wrong" was an overstatement on my part, as a few lines do make sense. But most are wrong, and very wrong, which is what gave me the initial shocked feeling of "entirely wrong".
 

TheOtherDrew

New Member
Sorry, I'm just starting out. I thought a sentence like "I love *x*" would be "*x* amo" in latin?
:) thanks for the replies anyway
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Amo is a correct translation for "I love", but the direct object (here, the thing you love) must be in the accusative case.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The nominative is for the subject of the verb, i.e. the person or thing that "does" the verb. The word or phrase that answers the question "Who/what [verb]s [the object]?" is the subject.

The accusative is for the direct object of the verb, i.e. the person or thing that's being acted upon. The word or phrase that answers the question "Whom/what does [the subject] [verb]?" is the direct object.

For instance, in the sentence "I love the mountains":

Who loves the mountains? I do. So "I" is the subject. Thus, if it were expressed by its own word in Latin, it would be nominative (ego) but that word is unnecessary unless the "I" is emphasized, since the ending of amo already tells us the subject is "I".

What do I love? The mountains. So "the mountains" is the direct object and should be in the accusative in Latin.
 
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