Carentibus

john abshire

Well-Known Member
ipse, a sene secundo aduitus, pecunia carentibus multas res dabat.
He himself, having been helped by the second old man, kept giving many things to those lacking money.

where does “those” come from?
Doesn’t there need to be an illis in there?
Also, why “kept giving”?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Also, why “kept giving”?
That's the way the author chose to render the sense of habit of the imperfect. It doesn't mean that an imperfect verb necessarily has to translate thus.
 

john abshire

Well-Known Member
From carentibus. No need for illīs — it's the English idiom that often asks for it in translation rather than Latin.
I am not sure what you mean, but without illis there is no indirect object. Carentibus; the literal translation is having been lacking.
Was Latin written without illis in enough examples to where it is now understood that illis is omitted?
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
I would have translated it as, "used to give".
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
I am not sure what you mean, but without illis there is no indirect object. Carentibus; the literal translation is having been lacking.
that is the literal translation, but here it means, "To those who lacked"

Was Latin written without illis in enough examples to where it is now understood that illis is omitted?
Latin often uses adjectives in place of a noun. You would only put illis in if you wanted to specifically point out a subgroup of those lacking.
 
I am not sure what you mean, but without illis there is no indirect object.
There is — carentibus, the dative plural of carēns. You can use the participle as a noun, and it's quite common. In your example it basically means "the ones who are lacking/those who are lacking".

Compare it with "living" in this English example: "Lord Jesus was appointed by God to judge the living (=those who are alive/those who are living) and the dead."

EDIT
Well, Cinefactus beat me to it.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I am not sure what you mean, but without illis there is no indirect object.
The indirect object is carentibus itself. That is perfectly normal in Latin. However, it doesn't work in English. You need to add a word like "those" or "people".
the literal translation is having been lacking.
No. It is "lacking".
 
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