Cic. Tusc. Disp. III, 12, 26

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Est autem inpudens luctus maerore se conficientis, quod imperare non liceat liberis.

I am having trouble parsing the main clause. Is conficientis supposed to agree with luctûs? It would make more sense perhaps if that participle were nominative.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

What if se conficientis (gen.) was determinative to luctus (nom.)?

The mourning of the one who prostrates himself in sorrow?

It must be that.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

ah, so a substantivised participle? I see.
 

Kosmokrator

Active Member

The mourning of the one who prostrates himself in sorrow?

right :)
 

Aurifex

Aedilis

  • Aedilis

  • Patronus

I'm not sure that "prostrate" is the best choice of verb in English. "Consume" or "wear out" might be better choices. It's usually the grief or sorrow that prostrates us, not ourselves. People tend to prostrate themselves in worship, or similar.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Sorry, sorry... Good to know.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus

  • Civis Illustris

I guess it means: "But shameless is the lament of one who lets himself be overcome with grief because he is unable to lord it over free men."
 
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