cum matres pavidae in aedibus errent infantes suos amplexae

Could someone help me out with this sentence? Does it mean "when mothers terrified of the environment wandered with their children"

cum matres pavidae in aedibus errent infantes suos amplexae

I'm wondering especially about the errare + infantes suos combination. I thought it would ablative of accompaniment, not accusative.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Ah, so it means "when the terrified mothers embracing their children wandered in aedibus"
Yes. I don't know the context of the sentence, but I would take in aedibus to mean "in the house".
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Yes. I don't know the context of the sentence, but I would take in aedibus to mean "in the house".
That would also presumably explain why erro is in the subjunctive.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
It is reminiscent of Aeneid II
Tum pavidae tēctīs mātrēs ingentibus errant;
amplexaeque tenent postīs atque ōscula fīgunt.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
We'd need to see the entire sentence in order to know why the subjunctive is used. We might have a concessive or causal cum clause or it could be a temporal one within indirect speech.
 
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