CURNULLASCRIPTIOCONTINUA?

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Does anyone know why the use of "v" is justified by people who don't wan't to use "j", e.g., Wheelock? (obviously if you're down with using "i" and "j," might as well use both "u" and "v")
That's the way I was taught so I have sticked to it out of habit and that's how I write, but honestly I don't know. It seems a bit illogical.
 

Laurentius

Man of Culture
I have wondered the same before and searched a bit on the net, but found nothing...
I have found one on a forum but the guy tells to contact him privately if someone wants it. Too bad it's a post made in 2008.
I gave it a try for fun but it's rather poor I think because I never did such things. Also I have no idea what to put for x, y and z.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Wow, I can't read that, lol. Can you transcribe?
 
Not ſure if wrong, but just ſtruck me as ſimilar to Runic reclining 'Π' for 'peor'.;)
Mark like full ſtop distinguiſhing 'e' from 'f' looks too much like miſplaced punctum. Real stroke would be better. Plain vertical ſtroke for 'i' would also be clearer.
 

Laurentius

Man of Culture
Not ſure if wrong, but just ſtruck me as ſimilar to Runic reclining 'Π' for 'peor'.;)
Mark like full ſtop distinguiſhing 'e' from 'f' looks too much like miſplaced punctum. Real stroke would be better. Plain vertical ſtroke for 'i' would also be clearer.
Isn't the p right? http://vindolanda.csad.ox.ac.uk/4DLink2/4DACTION/WebRequestQuery?searchTerm=299&searchType=number&searchField=TVII&thisListPosition=1&thisPageNum=0
I don't understand the other things, I didn't even put "f"s in the text I wrote.
 

metrodorus

Civis Illustris
If you look at the Vindolanda letters, you will see that when using cursive scripts, the daily script used by the Romans, words did indeed run together, but they also were sometimes separated from one another - much depended on the personal style of the individual writer. Writing materials were comparatively expensive, and space was limited - much like modern day post cards, but these were even smaller - cramming things in to the space was a reasonable thing to do. Google for 'Vindolanda Tablets Online'. There are also some excellent examples on display in the British Museum.
 
Top