Homework Dative Case Usage

Good evening, everyone. I was tasked with translating some sentences with grammar concepts I've learned in the last few weeks. I want to make sure my pronoun usage is correct, and my noun cases are okay. I'm curious about one thing though. In my first English to Latin sentence, is my use of the dative case with amico acceptable or should I use something like ad amicum?

Also, because I'm taking Latin online, all my "teacher" does is give me feedback on assignments and I don't directly contact him much. I've also discovered innumerable errors with the course program and even tests. I'm blessed to know experienced Latinists on this forum that answer all of my questions and concerns. After a few weeks of being on this forum, I feel tremendously better about translating and constructing sentences.

Latin To English
1. Tristis puella, quae in casā est, labōrat.
The sad girl, who is in the house, works.
2. Pater gladium mihi dedit.
The father gave a sword to me.
3. Pater pulchriorem urnam tibi dedit.
The father gave a beautiful urn to you.
4. Caesar eōs ducet.
Caesar will command them.
5. Vir tristior ad cubiculum ambulabat.
The sadder man walked to the bedroom.

English To Latin
1. He wrote a letter to a friend who lives in Rome.
Is litteram scripsit amico qui Romae vivit.
2. I want to see him.
Volo eum videre.
3. The soldier walks dutifully.
Miles pie ambulat.
4. It is good.
Id bonus est.
5. The lucky girl is happier.
Felix puella est laetior.

Sincerely,

Brian
 

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Civis Illustris

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Civis Illustris
1. He wrote a letter to a friend who lives in Rome.
Is litteram scripsit amico qui Romae vivit.
One more thing: littera in the singular usually means "letter" in the sense of a single alphabetic character. The letter that you send by mail is either litterae, -arum (plural) or epistola.
 
pulchriorem is comparative.
Wow, that slipped right by me. I somehow thought pulchrior was the positive form. :doh:

Both is possible.
Thanks for clarifying.

is is not needed.
That makes sense, as it's already implied in scriptsit.

Agreement.
Please expound, I believe you're implying my subject-verb agreement is off. It seems to me that third-person singular works as I’m saying “It is good” (he/she/it is in the third person singular), correct me if I'm wrong.

One more thing: littera in the singular usually means "letter" in the sense of a single alphabetic character. The letter that you send by mail is either litterae, -arum (plural) or epistola.
I appreciate the input. Here are my revisions:

Latin To English
1. Tristis puella, quae in casā est, labōrat.
The sad girl, who is in the house, works.
2. Pater gladium mihi dedit.
The father gave a sword to me.
3. Pater pulchriorem urnam tibi dedit.
The father gave a more beautiful urn to you.
4. Caesar eōs ducet.
Caesar will command them.
5. Vir tristior ad cubiculum ambulabat.
The sadder man walked to the bedroom.

English To Latin
1. He wrote a letter to a friend who lives in Rome.
Epistolam scripsit amico qui Romae vivit.
2. I want to see him.
Volo eum videre.
3. The soldier walks dutifully.
Miles pie ambulat.
4. It is good.
(Id bonus est.)
5. The lucky girl is happier.
Felix puella est laetior.
 
Ah, okay. Thank you for clarifying LCF. I didn’t realize they didn’t agree in gender.


Latin To English
1. Tristis puella, quae in casā est, labōrat.
The sad girl, who is in the house, works.
2. Pater gladium mihi dedit.
The father gave a sword to me.
3. Pater pulchriorem urnam tibi dedit.
The father gave a more beautiful urn to you.
4. Caesar eōs ducet.
Caesar will command them.
5. Vir tristior ad cubiculum ambulabat.
The sadder man walked to the bedroom.

English To Latin
1. He wrote a letter to a friend who lives in Rome.
Epistolam scripsit amico qui Romae vivit.
2. I want to see him.
Volo eum videre.
3. The soldier walks dutifully.
Miles pie ambulat.
4. It is good.
Id bonum est.
5. The lucky girl is happier.
Felix puella est laetior.
 

Glabrigausapes

Jive Turkey
Ah, okay. Thank you for clarifying LCF. I didn’t realize they didn’t agree in gender.


Latin To English
1. Tristis puella, quae in casā est, labōrat.
The sad girl, who is in the house, works.
2. Pater gladium mihi dedit.
The father gave a sword to me.
3. Pater pulchriorem urnam tibi dedit.
The father gave a more beautiful urn to you.
4. Caesar eōs ducet.
Caesar will command them.
5. Vir tristior ad cubiculum ambulabat.
The sadder man walked to the bedroom.

English To Latin
1. He wrote a letter to a friend who lives in Rome.
Epistolam scripsit amico qui Romae vivit.
2. I want to see him.
Volo eum videre.
3. The soldier walks dutifully.
Miles pie ambulat.
4. It is good.
Id bonum est.
5. The lucky girl is happier.
Felix puella est laetior.
Euge, euge, optume!
 
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